Is Mexican Spanish becoming a separate language from Spanish

Is Mexican Spanish becoming a separate language from Spanish?

Why, yes of course!! Just like US English is rapidly becoming a separate language from English.
Or not.
And both yes and no are acceptable answers to this question at the same time.
“Standard Spanish” is a Platonic ideal which isn’t the native language of any region in the world.
Just like “Standard English”.
ALL dialects of a language have centrifugal forces which tend to exagerate the regionalisms which are not completely understood everywhere else.
At the same time, some speakers (and the governments and supra-national bodies) have an interest in discarding those regionalisms that fail at spreading (or at least purging the educated speech from them as much as possible) in order to maximize the economic and social utility of having a common language with as many people as possible in an as far away an area as possible.
These 2 forces are always in a kind of equilibrium as long as the language is kept united.
Should Mexico cut ties with the rest of the Hispanic world and become isolated from it then there’d be no force to adopt the innovations occurring elsewhere in the Hispanic world, nor the other Spanish speakers would adopt the innovations happening in Mexico.
If massive communication is restarted after some centuries of absence, the result would be more or less like Quebec French (or Louisianna’s, same case) being understood with difficulty by European French speakers: to a base of archaic grammar and pronunciation, you add a heavy English influence plus local innovations (both in pronunciation and lexicon) and the mix makes the French and Belgians sometimes wonder if it’s really French.
If the cut-off had lasted some more centuries, North American forms of French would’ve indeed turned into sister languages of European French.
In the particular case of Spanish I don’t see this happening anytime soon: Mexico’s the biggest producer of audio-visual media in the Hispanic world, and the 2nd biggest book printer after Spain.
So most of our colloquialisms are readily understood by other Spanish speakers after so much exposure in the Spanish language movies and soap-operas, even if people in those countries don’t normally use them.
Heck, some of them have even been incorporated into other region’s speech after such exposure!! I’ve heard some Cubans calling a mess “un desmadre”, just like some Mexicans (me included!) have adopted “¡Vale!” from the Spaniards – centripetal forces are winning, at least for now.

The Spanish language has many variations; every language does.
It’s part of their evolutionary process.
These variations are due to regional, economic, political, and other societal factors.
These variations are visible, even, within the same country.
In Mexico, many variations of the Spanish language are known.
If you travel from Sinaloa to Michoacán, then to Veracruz, and end up in Monterrey, you’ll soon realize that people have different tones and words to express the same things.
It’s obviously the same language, people can understand one another, but there are significant, notable differences.
Though, usually one of the many variations becomes more prestigious because it’s used by literary works and by powerful public figures.
The rest of the variations become known as “dialects” and that prestigious variation becomes the standard way of speaking.
Again, this happens globally, but it’s also present within each country.
Therefore, it’s not that the Mexican Spanish is becoming a separate language, but rather, it’s a variation of the Spanish language, used by a big percentage of Spanish-speakers.
And within these Mexican Spanish speakers, they have their own variations as well.
For this variation to become its own language, it would have to go through many changes, and it’d have to be very different, almost unrecognizable, from the other variations of Spanish.

Don’t believe a lot of what the Mexicans here are telling you about their Mexican version of the Spanish language spreading.
In Europe Mexican Spanish is virtually unknown.
I live in Europe (I am South American) and here people learn and speak Castillian Spanish.
As far as South American Spanish speaking countries, there is barely any exposure to Mexico or its people on these countries.
The media used to be full of ridiculous Mexican soap operas but no youngster or educated person watches soap operas (statistics back it back), TV is not something most youngsters watch, Tv is mostly watched by old generations.
People look at the internet or netflix which has become common.
I am Colombian and we speak a very clear form of Spanish.
Mexican spanish is full of slang, sounds strange to most non-mexicans, and sometimes its hard to understand because of the immense amount of indigenous words they use.
I wouldn't say they are becoming a separate language, but only in their nationalistic chauvinistic dreams their language is becoming relevant.

Not in the slightest.
Mexican Spanish enjoys an analogue status as American English does for the Anglosphere.
Just like the USA exports so much media and has so many speakers all English speakers are used to American English and can identify it and understand it perfectly, Mexico exports so much media and has so many speakers all Spanish speakers are used to Mexican Spanish and can identify it and understand it perfectly.

Not at all.
There is only one Spanish, and that is Standard Spanish which MUST BE by its very nature, neutral Spanish.
Spanish has absolutely no dialects whatosever.
What it has tho, is regional variations, and that’s what the mexican variation is.
A quite spread variation, but not a separate language.

Hardly, dialects very rarely become a new language, and mexican is a dialect of Castilian, wich has being influenced very much by the lenguage of native mexicans, as is the case with all Spanish former colonies.
Spanglish, or "chicano" aren´t lenguages neither, but a mixture as the name suggest.
Saludos.

Is Mexican Spanish becoming a separate language from Spanish?

Why, yes of course!! Just like US English is rapidly becoming a separate language from English.
Or not.
And both yes and no are acceptable answers to this question at the same time.
“Standard Spanish” is a Platonic ideal which isn’t the native language of any region in the world.
Just like “Standard English”.
ALL dialects of a language have centrifugal forces which tend to exagerate the regionalisms which are not completely understood everywhere else.
At the same time, some speakers (and the governments and supra-national bodies) have an interest in discarding those regionalisms that fail at spreading (or at least purging the educated speech from them as much as possible) in order to maximize the economic and social utility of having a common language with as many people as possible in an as far away an area as possible.
These 2 forces are always in a kind of equilibrium as long as the language is kept united.
Should Mexico cut ties with the rest of the Hispanic world and become isolated from it then there’d be no force to adopt the innovations occurring elsewhere in the Hispanic world, nor the other Spanish speakers would adopt the innovations happening in Mexico.
If massive communication is restarted after some centuries of absence, the result would be more or less like Quebec French (or Louisianna’s, same case) being understood with difficulty by European French speakers: to a base of archaic grammar and pronunciation, you add a heavy English influence plus local innovations (both in pronunciation and lexicon) and the mix makes the French and Belgians sometimes wonder if it’s really French.
If the cut-off had lasted some more centuries, North American forms of French would’ve indeed turned into sister languages of European French.
In the particular case of Spanish I don’t see this happening anytime soon: Mexico’s the biggest producer of audio-visual media in the Hispanic world, and the 2nd biggest book printer after Spain.
So most of our colloquialisms are readily understood by other Spanish speakers after so much exposure in the Spanish language movies and soap-operas, even if people in those countries don’t normally use them.
Heck, some of them have even been incorporated into other region’s speech after such exposure!! I’ve heard some Cubans calling a mess “un desmadre”, just like some Mexicans (me included!) have adopted “¡Vale!” from the Spaniards – centripetal forces are winning, at least for now.

The Spanish language has many variations; every language does.
It’s part of their evolutionary process.
These variations are due to regional, economic, political, and other societal factors.
These variations are visible, even, within the same country.
In Mexico, many variations of the Spanish language are known.
If you travel from Sinaloa to Michoacán, then to Veracruz, and end up in Monterrey, you’ll soon realize that people have different tones and words to express the same things.
It’s obviously the same language, people can understand one another, but there are significant, notable differences.
Though, usually one of the many variations becomes more prestigious because it’s used by literary works and by powerful public figures.
The rest of the variations become known as “dialects” and that prestigious variation becomes the standard way of speaking.
Again, this happens globally, but it’s also present within each country.
Therefore, it’s not that the Mexican Spanish is becoming a separate language, but rather, it’s a variation of the Spanish language, used by a big percentage of Spanish-speakers.
And within these Mexican Spanish speakers, they have their own variations as well.
For this variation to become its own language, it would have to go through many changes, and it’d have to be very different, almost unrecognizable, from the other variations of Spanish.

Don’t believe a lot of what the Mexicans here are telling you about their Mexican version of the Spanish language spreading.
In Europe Mexican Spanish is virtually unknown.
I live in Europe (I am South American) and here people learn and speak Castillian Spanish.
As far as South American Spanish speaking countries, there is barely any exposure to Mexico or its people on these countries.
The media used to be full of ridiculous Mexican soap operas but no youngster or educated person watches soap operas (statistics back it back), TV is not something most youngsters watch, Tv is mostly watched by old generations.
People look at the internet or netflix which has become common.
I am Colombian and we speak a very clear form of Spanish.
Mexican spanish is full of slang, sounds strange to most non-mexicans, and sometimes its hard to understand because of the immense amount of indigenous words they use.
I wouldn't say they are becoming a separate language, but only in their nationalistic chauvinistic dreams their language is becoming relevant.

Not in the slightest.
Mexican Spanish enjoys an analogue status as American English does for the Anglosphere.
Just like the USA exports so much media and has so many speakers all English speakers are used to American English and can identify it and understand it perfectly, Mexico exports so much media and has so many speakers all Spanish speakers are used to Mexican Spanish and can identify it and understand it perfectly.

Not at all.
There is only one Spanish, and that is Standard Spanish which MUST BE by its very nature, neutral Spanish.
Spanish has absolutely no dialects whatosever.
What it has tho, is regional variations, and that’s what the mexican variation is.
A quite spread variation, but not a separate language.

Hardly, dialects very rarely become a new language, and mexican is a dialect of Castilian, wich has being influenced very much by the lenguage of native mexicans, as is the case with all Spanish former colonies.
Spanglish, or "chicano" aren´t lenguages neither, but a mixture as the name suggest.
Saludos.

Updated: 11.07.2019 — 3:53 pm

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