Is it hard to learn Spanish Why or why not

Is it hard to learn Spanish? Why or why not?

In some ways, Spanish is easier than English.
For example, letters are always pronounced the same way, and there are no silent letters.
When you read a word, you can confidently know how to say it correctly.
Is that the case in English? (knead vs.
need, dough, tear [like crying] vs.
tear [like ripping], etc… etc…) Wow, English is hard!
Still, Spanish is not always intuitive, and as with any language, there are some pitfalls to trip up newbies.
Here are a couple of the (many reasons) why Spanish is hard to learn:
False cognates
This mean words that you think sound like an English word… but they’re not! The classic example is embarazada.
You’d think that it means embarrassed, but it really means pregnant.
Misusing that one is embarrassing!
Nouns have genders
Particularly for English natives, this is a tough one.
La biblioteca … a girl library? Then there are exceptions where it is feminine but uses “el” instead of “la”, or vice versa… tricky.
Accents
Knowing where to put the accents (both in writing and speaking) can take some getting used to if you’re not accustomed to that.
Dropping pronouns
English: “I study Spanish.

Spanish: “Estudio español.

Where’s the “I”? It’s implied by the tense of the verb, “estudio”.
That’s just some; for more: cognates between the two languages, to the extent that sometimes you can just Hispanicize English words and just get away with it.
When you move to languages with lesser cognates, things get difficult.
Generally, students tend to put a time frame as to when he/she will become fluent in that language.
But as time goes by, they would realize that they are among the millions of language learners who have never kept up with their deadlines.
Fluency comes only with sheer practise.
And that's just for the spoken part.
Becoming a fluent speaker does not mean you can write good essays.
The latter has to be trained separately, especially due to the gap between formal and informal ways of speech.
As a student, I thought Spanish was easy to conquer, but it was only after I moved to a Spanish speaking country that I realized that "real" fluency was not anywhere within my reach.
By real fluency, I mean a level of comfort in a particular language that does not require even a bit of translation at the back of your mind, and most importantly, your sentences are formed the way native speakers form it.
In any given language, you may have different (grammatically correct) ways of expressing a particular thought, but the natives use only a few among them.
Some call it IDIOMATICS.
And if its different from your native tongue, then you would need more time to become "really" fluent in the target language.
Grammatical rules can be memorized and applied, and can be mastered with a few months of practise, but idiomatics has no general rule.
So you get the patterns only with time, accompanied with conscious recognition of the underlying differences in the syntax and choice of words.
That's why most language learners never get this area right, and some never ever, even after a lifetime of immersion.

I am a native American English speaker.
I have been teaching Spanish for over 25 years.
I have also studied it for almost 35.
I can also communicate in French and Russian.
When English speaking people say that Spanish is easy to learn, it is because, as others have said, it is a phonetic language.
Once you’ve learned the few rules and the way letters are pronounced, you can read Spanish aloud and be understood.
There are also a lot of cognates, so a lot of vocabulary is easy to acquire early in the learning process.
Verb conjugation in the present tense takes a bit of thinking, but, for the most part, most learners have a grasp on it within a month of study.
Within a few more months, with dedicated focus on memorizing vocabulary and practice of basic grammar, one can go on vacation to one of the 20 + beautiful Spanish speaking countries in the world and get by.
If conducting transactions with people in the hospitality industry in the local language (or one of them) is the goal of study, then I would say that it is easy to learn Spanish.
And I say this with no disrespect to that as a goal or to people who hold it as such.
I have been on many a trip where I see that people don’t even take the time to learn to say please and thank you in a local language and it always surprises and irks me.
I also say this because there are many languages where that is not true.
Russian, for example requires a lot more understanding of grammar in general, and then its grammar specifically to even be able to order at a restaurant.
Even though it is also a phonetic language, there are declensions that English speakers have nothing to compare to in their own language.
This makes forming a simple sentence much more difficult.
If the goal is to be able to get to know people and have conversations about complex topics, then Spanish gets harder to learn.
The proper and complete use of the subjunctive is one of the most difficult for English speakers and also one of the most important concepts needed for any real and beyond-skin-deep conversation.
There is also the use of the passive voice that should be mastered to be fluent in Spanish, while it is often discouraged in English and therefore “beaten” out of us.
For me, the beauty of language (beyond simple communication- which is, of course beautiful) is how it reflects the perspective of its speakers.
This can be at many levels .
Studies are showing that people whose native language is gendered (as Spanish is) have different perspectives than native English speakers and others whose native language is also non-gendered.
At the other end of the spectrum, there are differences in vocabulary between regions in the same country that can tell us a lot about differing perspectives.
The use of language differs between different demographic groups within the same geographical location.
Age, socioeconomic class, gender, education level all affect our use of language.
The ability to hear those differences requires a good grasp of the language.
If those nuances are important, then the study of Spanish (like any other language) can be life long and difficult.
But ultimately completely worth it.

It isn’t.
Trust me, it isn’t indeed – not by a looooong shot.
And I’m not saying it just because I learned it as a baby.
Have you tried Sanskrit? I did.
Twice.
First time I failed horribly and left feeling very frustrated and with feelings of inadequacy towards learning a language.
I mean, if my teacher is recognized as really good and I was applying myself, then the fault must’ve been on me, right? Second time, with a different teacher using a vastly different method, I succeeded in learning the basics of this wonderful yet complicated language.
Now that’s a HARD TO LEARN LANGUAGE (TM)!!!
What this learning experience taught me is that we don’t all learn the same way – so if you’re not “groking” a particular teaching method by a particular professor, it may not be entirely your fault.
Of course – if you don’t do your homework, don’t study your past lessons semi-periodically, don’t try to go further than what you saw within the classroom… in other words if you’re not willing to work out HARD, then it is indeed entirely your fault – learning is not a passive experience, and learning a language forces us to strive harder than history or sometimes even than mathematics.
But if you do work out hard and are not getting results, then either you’re using a flawed studying strategy, or are on the receiving end of a flawed teaching methodology, or simply that particular method is not the best suited for you.
Switch to another teacher and if that doesn’t work, try another teaching method and/or environment.
Plus, you’ll never get anywhere if you’re content with just what you received at the classroom.
Listen to music in Spanish (obvious: search for bands you like) and try to memorize the lyrics: this way you’ll learn in a painless form a lot of vocabulary plus a bit of grammar (e.
g.
I improved my French participles after I took a liking to some Celine Dion songs that for some reason were heavy on this particular conjugation) , try to read books/comics/blogs in Spanish.
Search for stuff you like! Books/comics meant for children are especially good for language learners, as well as subtitled or voiced-over shows in your natal tongue (I’m assuming it’s English) that you love and have seen extensively – believe it or not, I know at least one person who learned colloquial Japanese (after she discovered the formal variety taught at school was to no use to understanding common folks at the street) by watching “The Simpsons” in Japanese.

There are a few things that are hard about Spanish.

I don’t know what your problem is exactly with Spanish, but these are probably the most common reason that people think Spanish is hard.
Here are some solutions to these problems to make Spanish easy!
A- ah, like the o in mock (m-ah-k)
E- eh, kind of like EH- very- one (everyone)
I- ee (Eat)
O- like the o in Ocean
U- oo (OOps!)
If you need help with rolling your rrrr’s, them just search on YouTube: How to roll the r in Spanish
3.
And lastly, for the verb tenses, what I did was just memorized one a day.
That’s it! And after only three months, I mastered every single one!
Well, hoped that helped, and Buena Suerte  on your Spanish learning journey!
P.
S.
Spanish is actually supposed to be one of the easiest languages to learn on Earth!

¡Los pronombres son un gran coñazo!
Pronouns and how they are used in sentances is probably the one single area of castilian/spanish that is without doubt difficult for native Anglophone speakers to grasp well and takes time (or indeed for a native speaker of any other germanic language learning spanish as well for that matter).
In contrast to almost all other areas of castilian grammar, which can be mastered close to perfect in an educational environment alone if done with dedication, without immersing yourself in the language and using it practically for an extended period of time, you will not master the nuances of pronuons and how pronouns naturally flow in native speaker's sentances.
In essence you will only ever sound very stilted and obviously foreign if the concept of Spanish pronouns is a bit lost on you.
The ubiquitious variety of pronoun usage in addition – With reflexive pronouns, intensifiers, direct and indirect objects pronouns and their combinations, usage of pronouns with prepositions, and crucially the different order that one would expect from a germanic-language speaker's perspective, even of the most simple of example phrases:
melo give it to me
yo te veoI see you
All of the reasons abouve makes it even more complex and precarious a beast to master.
Other answers mention things such as genders, accents, verb conjugation etc.
but all of those can be mastered in the classroom, and the concepts are not particularly unique to castilian either – in fact in all of the major related languages (Portuguese, French, Catalan, Italian) are these concepts much more complex and difficult than Castilian.
It's Spanish pronouns that students never fully get until they get the opportunity to use them in trial and error situations in real life.
They're not the type of thing that can be just memorized.
I would also give an honourable mention as well to the concept of the subjunctive sometimes being difficult for native speakers of English to understand (although some grasp it fairly quickly), and finally to how to swear naturally like castilian speakers, as in spoken Castilian it simply is something you do need to know how to interject with ease into phrases (with the appropriate intensifiers) in order to sound as though you command the language naturally in informal settings.
This is something that non-native learners of english generally only need to neccessary do if they are in Ireland, Scotland or Australia if they don't wish to sound out of place, whereas in the hispanophone world it is almost universal.

The answer depends on how you define “difficult” and “learn”.
If you define “difficult” in relative terms, then Spanish, like other Romance languages, is easier to learn than languages that are more distantly related to English, such as Russian or Hindi, and much easier to learn than languages that are not related at all, such as Chinese or Arabic.
But Spanish isn’t a walk in the park.
Although the spelling and pronunciation are relatively simple, the grammar is quite complex.
So if you’re looking, say, for a language that’s easier than French, be prepared to be surprised once you get past the basics.
If you define “learn” as “fully master”, it can take years to get to full proficiency, unless you are able to spend time living in a Spanish-speaking country, and/or have a lot of time to devote to your studies.
But if you have more modest expectations, and work consistently, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to achieve a decent level of conversational competence, or read simple texts, in a year or two.
The big X factor — or, perhaps, X and Y, is your motivation and perseverance.
The more you can expose yourself to Spanish, and the more you can throw yourself into the task, the more progress you will make.
Fifteen minutes a couple of times a week won’t get you far.
¡Buena suerte!

The grammar and sentence structure are different from English, but simpler.
Learning Spanish is not that hard to learn.
if you have a perfect guider then it is easy to learn.
At the same time Spanish is considered one of the easiest languages for a native English speaker to learn.
Tips to learn spanish easily:
You can learn Spanish more easily from online courses.
.
Try to learn from them.
Here are the Best Spanish Online Courses:
Nahuatl is also incredibly different and more difficult to pronounce.
Which is more important? conversation or grammar?
Probably conversation.
There are so many slang words and phrases of expression that don't follow the rules of grammar that I would prefer to be able to speak like a local when I'm in a group of people or at a party.
I definitely want to know correct grammar also, especially for my future job, but conversation is more important in day to day life.
Here is the interview:
enchanting sounds like the CH in chemestry or the one in french.
In Spanish, there are a lot of rules, and the diversity in the language makes it even more difficult.
In English, for example, you can mean only you or you and them.
In Spanish we have (informal) and usted (formal) for only you, but for you and them we use ustedes (both formal and informal), oh and that's only for Mexican Spanish.
For South American Spanish, we should use vos (I don't know if this is formal or informal) and vosotros; furthermore, vosotros can be confused with nosotros, which means us.
Another thing to take in consideration is that since Spanish is spoken in several parts of the world, and some are isolated (like Spain), the language varies a lot.
Where I come from (Sinaloa), it is common to use the word morro, which for some people may mean nothing, for others, it may mean the lips, for others it may mean something totally different, but what we mean with that is child.
Choclo for Chileans means maize, and to me, it sounds like chancla (slide shoe), but we call the maize elote.
There are many, many things to take in consideration, and those were just a few examples.

It is not, that is a personal perception.
It depends on so many factors.
We are all different and have different aptitudes.
Some people learn faster than others, some are better than others, but this depends on how hard you work and how much you insist.
You see, practice make perfect, that is all you need.
It helps a lot if you have a motivation, the time to do it, and are willing to perseverate, that means you do not give up easily.
Start by making a plan and stick to it.
If you can afford it, I will suggest you travel to any Spanish speaking near where you live.
If you can not, there are other possibilities you may consider appropriate, like through music, films, friends, books.
etc.
The more you learn the easy will get.
Learning a language is fun, interesting, nice, useful.
And Spanish can offer you a new universe.
You will not regret.

Since the question is in English (my second language myself I learned English through immersion at 10 but was reading in Spanish at four) my answer is assuming you're primary or secondary English speaker.
And speaking both I'd say Spanish easier due to the fact that anyone can learn to pronounce any word in Spanish in couple of hours.
Whereas English one has to learn pretty much everything from meaning to how a particular word is pronounced and spelled by memory WTF to -too-two!! Weather- wether!! Etc.
Impossible to spell logically, half million words to learn too.
One big advantage though English doesn't require memorization of nouns having a gender attribute which complicates Spanish and many other languages( there is no logic to that even borrowed English words (la web – the internet is female for no good reason).
Another is the use of the formal and informal forms for addressing others (i.
e.
usted or tu? , but one can avoid it by initially speaking formally which might sound awkward but isn't insulting) I can imagine how much more difficult English would be then.

Spanish is much more easier to learn than many, probably the most European languages.

Reading & writing is simple, you write/read just by joining the letters & pronounce as you are seeing it, no complex word construction as in English or somewhat in French.
Is it easy for the English learners to spell correctly “Shakespeare”? Or the French city Bogdiu? (it’s written Bordeaux & pronounced Bogdiu or Bogdu).
Listen to the US pronounciation of the word “Entrepreneur” at wordreference, OMG!
 In Spanish Madrid is Madrid, Barcelona is written/read/pronounced exactly as you see it, Valencia is Valencia, Bilbao is Bilbao.
You don’t have to learn to pronounce each & every word of the dictionary as in English (& somewhat in French), even two letter words are pronounced differently in English e.
g.
“Go”, “Do” or “To”.
Comparatively Spanish is homogeneous.

No complicated word declensions as in German or Russian, even the name of a person changes depending on the context of the sentence, OMG!!
No such grammatical complications at all in Spanish, obey a couple of rules & adorn your CV with Spanish (High Level), or may visit the Seville Spring Fair & enjoy the Flamenco sipping a refreshing cup of sherry.

For me, as someone who has been grappling with the Spanish language as a non-native learner… without a doubt SUBJUNCTIVE VERB FORMS!!!!
I was soooo excited when we reached the end of the Indicative verb forms in Spanish class and I actually almost understood them! Then my Spanish teacher did something I can never really forgive him for… he told us that the following week would be starting all over again, with SUBJUNCTIVES!!! (oh and not only that we would be starting with one option but we would have to learn TWO options for every subjunctive verb form because we might end up having to use them both!!! NOT flipping likely matey!)! I think I finally understand WHEN I should be using them (after 9 years living in Madrid and a further 4 years studying Spanish at school in the UK) but I seriously doubt if I will ever be able to call the right conjugation to mind as I need it! I have enough fun and games with the Indicatives thank you!!!!!!!

Is Spanish easy to learn?
Well, that depends on lot of factors such as how close is your native language to Spanish.
If you are a Romance language native speaker then it’s going to be somewhat easier than learning other languages but this doesn’t mean you can’t learn it.
If you are passionate to learn the language then you can learn any language of this world.
I am a native Hindi Speaker(Would be better to say Hinglish since I am from South Delhi) and I am at High – Intermediate level in Spanish.
I studied Spanish all by myself and whatever I learned I practiced that with Native Spanish Speakers and they were kind enough to correct me and help me learn more.
I am not saying I am super fluent in the language but I am good enough to read Comics, Books, watch Movies in Spanish and enjoy Songs in Spanish.
Now, How I did it? It’s because I was passionate about the language and that was my motivation which helped me learn the language.
If I can then I am pretty sure you can do it too.
Good Luck.

At the end of the day, Spanish probably isn’t that much harder to learn than any other language.
In fact, in many ways, it’s a lot easier.
For example, letters are always pronounced exactly the same way.
Think about it, in English, there are often multiple ways to pronounce a word like “lead”.
You can lead a horse, but you can also have lead paint, and they’re not said the same way.
Additionally, though, through, and trough don’t rhyme.
What?!
In Spanish, an “a” is always pronounced the same way, no matter what letters are around it, or where in the word it falls.
If there is ever an instance where two words are spelled identically, one will have an accent whereas the other will not (ie, te and té are different words and are pronounced differently, which is clear from simply reading them).
So in those ways, it’s easy in the sense that you can read words aloud and have confidence that you are saying them right (accent… that’s another story).
In some ways, Spanish is definitely hard to wrap your head around, particularly if you’re a native English speaker trying to learn Spanish as your first additional language.
Pronouns, gendered nouns, tenses, and irregular verbs are among the many things that trip up novices.
Here are a number more:
AVOID THEM! If you want to have fun, I recommend you going to the beaches, bars and clubs of Marbella or Ibiza or Las Palmas or any other place in Spain.
You'll have more fun than studying Spanish with obsolete methods.
Most methods say that the student will learn Spanish in a few days.
AVOID THEM! I am sure that, if you meet the right people in Spain, you will learn more Spanish in less time than if you go to the most expensive language school in the world.
At least you will not waste your time.
No language learning method takes into account the student's time.
Except mine.
How long will it take me to learn this lesson? No method answers this question.
No method knows how long it will take you to learn any lesson.
Some teachers or methods say the Spanish Subjunctive, the personal pronouns, the personal pronouns, the imperfect indicative or the conjugation of verbs in Spanish are extremely difficult to learn.
They just don’t t know how to teach Spanish properly.

Beware of false cognates when learning Spanish, an example is “emabrazada” it does not mean embarrassed, it means “pregnant.
” Aside from that Spanish is a fairly simple language to learn.
The only thing that you will find difficult most likely is “el subjuntivo” which means the subjunctive which is one of 3 Spanish “moods”/tenses.
The other Spanish tenses are the “imperativo” (the imperative) and the “indicativo” which is the indicative.
The subjunctive is used to express desires, doubts, the unknown, the abstract, and emotions.
According to a neutral source the subjunctive mood includes many of the same verb tenses as the indicative mood, including the perfect, the past, and the future, which is rarely used in modern Spanish, but good to know for literature.
In my studies and in my reading I have often encountered the subjunctive so I do not believe it to be rare and think it is important to listen carefully when learning Spanish so you can understand when the subjunctive is used.

There is no clear cut answer for this question as it is highly dependent on the person, their natural ability to pick up languages, the resources available, and the dedication to learning the language.
The answer also depends on what you mean by “learn”.
Do mean the basics, general conversation, ability to read and write, or able to carry on a deep conversation?
If one is reasonably dedicated and persistent, then the basics can be learned within 6 months or less.
If you want to be able to carry on a basic conversation (more than just ordering food and asking where the bathroom is), then a year is not unreasonable.
Of course, the more time you dedicate, the more likely you are to progress quickly.
Ultimately, it depends on where you want to be.
If you want to be able to listen to radio, watch TV or movies, then it will most likely take you a few years.
If you are able to go to a Spanish-speaking country for a few months, that will be the best teaching experience you can get.
Forced to speak a language, and you will pick it up much quicker than just listening to language audio books in your car.
As you can see, there is no precise way to predict how long it might take you to learn Spanish to the level you want as there are multiple factors that come into play.
Good luck.

Nothing really, assuming your native language is English or one of the Romance languages.
I'd say Spanish is one of the easiest languages to learn (it's certainly the easiest of the languages I've studied).
Its verb endings are highly regular, and even its relatively few irregular endings tend to follow a pattern.
I'd say the single thing that most trips up English speakers is determining when to use the preterite vs.
the imperfect — and then only really for a few verbs, such as to be, to have, to live.
But Spanish grammar is really a breeze compared to English grammar.
Ditto for spelling, once you learn the alphabet and the handful of letters that sound different from their English counterparts.
Also, a lot of the vocabulary is similar, since so much of the English vocabulary is Latin-based due to the Norman influence following the Norman conquest of England.

So Spanish really isn't particularly difficult, all things considered.
 

No.
it is not difficult to learn Spanish.
I think it is easy to learn if you do Practice daily.
Spanish, also called Castilian, is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin America and Spain.
You can learn spanish by reading, Speaking, Writing, and Listening.
By learning Spanish, you'll be better able to communicate with Spanish speakers.
It is better for you to learn Spanish from the Online courses.
I can also recommend you the Best Spanish Online courses.

#1
cognates between the two languages, to the extent that sometimes you can just Hispanicize English words and just get away with it.
When you move to languages with lesser cognates, things get difficult.
Generally, students tend to put a time frame as to when he/she will become fluent in that language.
But as time goes by, they would realize that they are among the millions of language learners who have never kept up with their deadlines.
Fluency comes only with sheer practise.
And that's just for the spoken part.
Becoming a fluent speaker does not mean you can write good essays.
The latter has to be trained separately, especially due to the gap between formal and informal ways of speech.
As a student, I thought Spanish was easy to conquer, but it was only after I moved to a Spanish speaking country that I realized that "real" fluency was not anywhere within my reach.
By real fluency, I mean a level of comfort in a particular language that does not require even a bit of translation at the back of your mind, and most importantly, your sentences are formed the way native speakers form it.
In any given language, you may have different (grammatically correct) ways of expressing a particular thought, but the natives use only a few among them.
Some call it IDIOMATICS.
And if its different from your native tongue, then you would need more time to become "really" fluent in the target language.
Grammatical rules can be memorized and applied, and can be mastered with a few months of practise, but idiomatics has no general rule.
So you get the patterns only with time, accompanied with conscious recognition of the underlying differences in the syntax and choice of words.
That's why most language learners never get this area right, and some never ever, even after a lifetime of immersion.

I am a native American English speaker.
I have been teaching Spanish for over 25 years.
I have also studied it for almost 35.
I can also communicate in French and Russian.
When English speaking people say that Spanish is easy to learn, it is because, as others have said, it is a phonetic language.
Once you’ve learned the few rules and the way letters are pronounced, you can read Spanish aloud and be understood.
There are also a lot of cognates, so a lot of vocabulary is easy to acquire early in the learning process.
Verb conjugation in the present tense takes a bit of thinking, but, for the most part, most learners have a grasp on it within a month of study.
Within a few more months, with dedicated focus on memorizing vocabulary and practice of basic grammar, one can go on vacation to one of the 20 + beautiful Spanish speaking countries in the world and get by.
If conducting transactions with people in the hospitality industry in the local language (or one of them) is the goal of study, then I would say that it is easy to learn Spanish.
And I say this with no disrespect to that as a goal or to people who hold it as such.
I have been on many a trip where I see that people don’t even take the time to learn to say please and thank you in a local language and it always surprises and irks me.
I also say this because there are many languages where that is not true.
Russian, for example requires a lot more understanding of grammar in general, and then its grammar specifically to even be able to order at a restaurant.
Even though it is also a phonetic language, there are declensions that English speakers have nothing to compare to in their own language.
This makes forming a simple sentence much more difficult.
If the goal is to be able to get to know people and have conversations about complex topics, then Spanish gets harder to learn.
The proper and complete use of the subjunctive is one of the most difficult for English speakers and also one of the most important concepts needed for any real and beyond-skin-deep conversation.
There is also the use of the passive voice that should be mastered to be fluent in Spanish, while it is often discouraged in English and therefore “beaten” out of us.
For me, the beauty of language (beyond simple communication- which is, of course beautiful) is how it reflects the perspective of its speakers.
This can be at many levels .
Studies are showing that people whose native language is gendered (as Spanish is) have different perspectives than native English speakers and others whose native language is also non-gendered.
At the other end of the spectrum, there are differences in vocabulary between regions in the same country that can tell us a lot about differing perspectives.
The use of language differs between different demographic groups within the same geographical location.
Age, socioeconomic class, gender, education level all affect our use of language.
The ability to hear those differences requires a good grasp of the language.
If those nuances are important, then the study of Spanish (like any other language) can be life long and difficult.
But ultimately completely worth it.

It isn’t.
Trust me, it isn’t indeed – not by a looooong shot.
And I’m not saying it just because I learned it as a baby.
Have you tried Sanskrit? I did.
Twice.
First time I failed horribly and left feeling very frustrated and with feelings of inadequacy towards learning a language.
I mean, if my teacher is recognized as really good and I was applying myself, then the fault must’ve been on me, right? Second time, with a different teacher using a vastly different method, I succeeded in learning the basics of this wonderful yet complicated language.
Now that’s a HARD TO LEARN LANGUAGE (TM)!!!
What this learning experience taught me is that we don’t all learn the same way – so if you’re not “groking” a particular teaching method by a particular professor, it may not be entirely your fault.
Of course – if you don’t do your homework, don’t study your past lessons semi-periodically, don’t try to go further than what you saw within the classroom… in other words if you’re not willing to work out HARD, then it is indeed entirely your fault – learning is not a passive experience, and learning a language forces us to strive harder than history or sometimes even than mathematics.
But if you do work out hard and are not getting results, then either you’re using a flawed studying strategy, or are on the receiving end of a flawed teaching methodology, or simply that particular method is not the best suited for you.
Switch to another teacher and if that doesn’t work, try another teaching method and/or environment.
Plus, you’ll never get anywhere if you’re content with just what you received at the classroom.
Listen to music in Spanish (obvious: search for bands you like) and try to memorize the lyrics: this way you’ll learn in a painless form a lot of vocabulary plus a bit of grammar (e.
g.
I improved my French participles after I took a liking to some Celine Dion songs that for some reason were heavy on this particular conjugation) , try to read books/comics/blogs in Spanish.
Search for stuff you like! Books/comics meant for children are especially good for language learners, as well as subtitled or voiced-over shows in your natal tongue (I’m assuming it’s English) that you love and have seen extensively – believe it or not, I know at least one person who learned colloquial Japanese (after she discovered the formal variety taught at school was to no use to understanding common folks at the street) by watching “The Simpsons” in Japanese.

There are a few things that are hard about Spanish.

I don’t know what your problem is exactly with Spanish, but these are probably the most common reason that people think Spanish is hard.
Here are some solutions to these problems to make Spanish easy!
A- ah, like the o in mock (m-ah-k)
E- eh, kind of like EH- very- one (everyone)
I- ee (Eat)
O- like the o in Ocean
U- oo (OOps!)
If you need help with rolling your rrrr’s, them just search on YouTube: How to roll the r in Spanish
3.
And lastly, for the verb tenses, what I did was just memorized one a day.
That’s it! And after only three months, I mastered every single one!
Well, hoped that helped, and Buena Suerte  on your Spanish learning journey!
P.
S.
Spanish is actually supposed to be one of the easiest languages to learn on Earth!

¡Los pronombres son un gran coñazo!
Pronouns and how they are used in sentances is probably the one single area of castilian/spanish that is without doubt difficult for native Anglophone speakers to grasp well and takes time (or indeed for a native speaker of any other germanic language learning spanish as well for that matter).
In contrast to almost all other areas of castilian grammar, which can be mastered close to perfect in an educational environment alone if done with dedication, without immersing yourself in the language and using it practically for an extended period of time, you will not master the nuances of pronuons and how pronouns naturally flow in native speaker's sentances.
In essence you will only ever sound very stilted and obviously foreign if the concept of Spanish pronouns is a bit lost on you.
The ubiquitious variety of pronoun usage in addition – With reflexive pronouns, intensifiers, direct and indirect objects pronouns and their combinations, usage of pronouns with prepositions, and crucially the different order that one would expect from a germanic-language speaker's perspective, even of the most simple of example phrases:
melo give it to me
yo te veoI see you
All of the reasons abouve makes it even more complex and precarious a beast to master.
Other answers mention things such as genders, accents, verb conjugation etc.
but all of those can be mastered in the classroom, and the concepts are not particularly unique to castilian either – in fact in all of the major related languages (Portuguese, French, Catalan, Italian) are these concepts much more complex and difficult than Castilian.
It's Spanish pronouns that students never fully get until they get the opportunity to use them in trial and error situations in real life.
They're not the type of thing that can be just memorized.
I would also give an honourable mention as well to the concept of the subjunctive sometimes being difficult for native speakers of English to understand (although some grasp it fairly quickly), and finally to how to swear naturally like castilian speakers, as in spoken Castilian it simply is something you do need to know how to interject with ease into phrases (with the appropriate intensifiers) in order to sound as though you command the language naturally in informal settings.
This is something that non-native learners of english generally only need to neccessary do if they are in Ireland, Scotland or Australia if they don't wish to sound out of place, whereas in the hispanophone world it is almost universal.

The answer depends on how you define “difficult” and “learn”.
If you define “difficult” in relative terms, then Spanish, like other Romance languages, is easier to learn than languages that are more distantly related to English, such as Russian or Hindi, and much easier to learn than languages that are not related at all, such as Chinese or Arabic.
But Spanish isn’t a walk in the park.
Although the spelling and pronunciation are relatively simple, the grammar is quite complex.
So if you’re looking, say, for a language that’s easier than French, be prepared to be surprised once you get past the basics.
If you define “learn” as “fully master”, it can take years to get to full proficiency, unless you are able to spend time living in a Spanish-speaking country, and/or have a lot of time to devote to your studies.
But if you have more modest expectations, and work consistently, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to achieve a decent level of conversational competence, or read simple texts, in a year or two.
The big X factor — or, perhaps, X and Y, is your motivation and perseverance.
The more you can expose yourself to Spanish, and the more you can throw yourself into the task, the more progress you will make.
Fifteen minutes a couple of times a week won’t get you far.
¡Buena suerte!

The grammar and sentence structure are different from English, but simpler.
Learning Spanish is not that hard to learn.
if you have a perfect guider then it is easy to learn.
At the same time Spanish is considered one of the easiest languages for a native English speaker to learn.
Tips to learn spanish easily:
You can learn Spanish more easily from online courses.
.
Try to learn from them.
Here are the Best Spanish Online Courses:
Nahuatl is also incredibly different and more difficult to pronounce.
Which is more important? conversation or grammar?
Probably conversation.
There are so many slang words and phrases of expression that don't follow the rules of grammar that I would prefer to be able to speak like a local when I'm in a group of people or at a party.
I definitely want to know correct grammar also, especially for my future job, but conversation is more important in day to day life.
Here is the interview:
enchanting sounds like the CH in chemestry or the one in french.
In Spanish, there are a lot of rules, and the diversity in the language makes it even more difficult.
In English, for example, you can mean only you or you and them.
In Spanish we have (informal) and usted (formal) for only you, but for you and them we use ustedes (both formal and informal), oh and that's only for Mexican Spanish.
For South American Spanish, we should use vos (I don't know if this is formal or informal) and vosotros; furthermore, vosotros can be confused with nosotros, which means us.
Another thing to take in consideration is that since Spanish is spoken in several parts of the world, and some are isolated (like Spain), the language varies a lot.
Where I come from (Sinaloa), it is common to use the word morro, which for some people may mean nothing, for others, it may mean the lips, for others it may mean something totally different, but what we mean with that is child.
Choclo for Chileans means maize, and to me, it sounds like chancla (slide shoe), but we call the maize elote.
There are many, many things to take in consideration, and those were just a few examples.

It is not, that is a personal perception.
It depends on so many factors.
We are all different and have different aptitudes.
Some people learn faster than others, some are better than others, but this depends on how hard you work and how much you insist.
You see, practice make perfect, that is all you need.
It helps a lot if you have a motivation, the time to do it, and are willing to perseverate, that means you do not give up easily.
Start by making a plan and stick to it.
If you can afford it, I will suggest you travel to any Spanish speaking near where you live.
If you can not, there are other possibilities you may consider appropriate, like through music, films, friends, books.
etc.
The more you learn the easy will get.
Learning a language is fun, interesting, nice, useful.
And Spanish can offer you a new universe.
You will not regret.

Since the question is in English (my second language myself I learned English through immersion at 10 but was reading in Spanish at four) my answer is assuming you're primary or secondary English speaker.
And speaking both I'd say Spanish easier due to the fact that anyone can learn to pronounce any word in Spanish in couple of hours.
Whereas English one has to learn pretty much everything from meaning to how a particular word is pronounced and spelled by memory WTF to -too-two!! Weather- wether!! Etc.
Impossible to spell logically, half million words to learn too.
One big advantage though English doesn't require memorization of nouns having a gender attribute which complicates Spanish and many other languages( there is no logic to that even borrowed English words (la web – the internet is female for no good reason).
Another is the use of the formal and informal forms for addressing others (i.
e.
usted or tu? , but one can avoid it by initially speaking formally which might sound awkward but isn't insulting) I can imagine how much more difficult English would be then.

Spanish is much more easier to learn than many, probably the most European languages.

Reading & writing is simple, you write/read just by joining the letters & pronounce as you are seeing it, no complex word construction as in English or somewhat in French.
Is it easy for the English learners to spell correctly “Shakespeare”? Or the French city Bogdiu? (it’s written Bordeaux & pronounced Bogdiu or Bogdu).
Listen to the US pronounciation of the word “Entrepreneur” at wordreference, OMG!
 In Spanish Madrid is Madrid, Barcelona is written/read/pronounced exactly as you see it, Valencia is Valencia, Bilbao is Bilbao.
You don’t have to learn to pronounce each & every word of the dictionary as in English (& somewhat in French), even two letter words are pronounced differently in English e.
g.
“Go”, “Do” or “To”.
Comparatively Spanish is homogeneous.

No complicated word declensions as in German or Russian, even the name of a person changes depending on the context of the sentence, OMG!!
No such grammatical complications at all in Spanish, obey a couple of rules & adorn your CV with Spanish (High Level), or may visit the Seville Spring Fair & enjoy the Flamenco sipping a refreshing cup of sherry.

For me, as someone who has been grappling with the Spanish language as a non-native learner… without a doubt SUBJUNCTIVE VERB FORMS!!!!
I was soooo excited when we reached the end of the Indicative verb forms in Spanish class and I actually almost understood them! Then my Spanish teacher did something I can never really forgive him for… he told us that the following week would be starting all over again, with SUBJUNCTIVES!!! (oh and not only that we would be starting with one option but we would have to learn TWO options for every subjunctive verb form because we might end up having to use them both!!! NOT flipping likely matey!)! I think I finally understand WHEN I should be using them (after 9 years living in Madrid and a further 4 years studying Spanish at school in the UK) but I seriously doubt if I will ever be able to call the right conjugation to mind as I need it! I have enough fun and games with the Indicatives thank you!!!!!!!

Is Spanish easy to learn?
Well, that depends on lot of factors such as how close is your native language to Spanish.
If you are a Romance language native speaker then it’s going to be somewhat easier than learning other languages but this doesn’t mean you can’t learn it.
If you are passionate to learn the language then you can learn any language of this world.
I am a native Hindi Speaker(Would be better to say Hinglish since I am from South Delhi) and I am at High – Intermediate level in Spanish.
I studied Spanish all by myself and whatever I learned I practiced that with Native Spanish Speakers and they were kind enough to correct me and help me learn more.
I am not saying I am super fluent in the language but I am good enough to read Comics, Books, watch Movies in Spanish and enjoy Songs in Spanish.
Now, How I did it? It’s because I was passionate about the language and that was my motivation which helped me learn the language.
If I can then I am pretty sure you can do it too.
Good Luck.

At the end of the day, Spanish probably isn’t that much harder to learn than any other language.
In fact, in many ways, it’s a lot easier.
For example, letters are always pronounced exactly the same way.
Think about it, in English, there are often multiple ways to pronounce a word like “lead”.
You can lead a horse, but you can also have lead paint, and they’re not said the same way.
Additionally, though, through, and trough don’t rhyme.
What?!
In Spanish, an “a” is always pronounced the same way, no matter what letters are around it, or where in the word it falls.
If there is ever an instance where two words are spelled identically, one will have an accent whereas the other will not (ie, te and té are different words and are pronounced differently, which is clear from simply reading them).
So in those ways, it’s easy in the sense that you can read words aloud and have confidence that you are saying them right (accent… that’s another story).
In some ways, Spanish is definitely hard to wrap your head around, particularly if you’re a native English speaker trying to learn Spanish as your first additional language.
Pronouns, gendered nouns, tenses, and irregular verbs are among the many things that trip up novices.
Here are a number more:
AVOID THEM! If you want to have fun, I recommend you going to the beaches, bars and clubs of Marbella or Ibiza or Las Palmas or any other place in Spain.
You'll have more fun than studying Spanish with obsolete methods.
Most methods say that the student will learn Spanish in a few days.
AVOID THEM! I am sure that, if you meet the right people in Spain, you will learn more Spanish in less time than if you go to the most expensive language school in the world.
At least you will not waste your time.
No language learning method takes into account the student's time.
Except mine.
How long will it take me to learn this lesson? No method answers this question.
No method knows how long it will take you to learn any lesson.
Some teachers or methods say the Spanish Subjunctive, the personal pronouns, the personal pronouns, the imperfect indicative or the conjugation of verbs in Spanish are extremely difficult to learn.
They just don’t t know how to teach Spanish properly.

Beware of false cognates when learning Spanish, an example is “emabrazada” it does not mean embarrassed, it means “pregnant.
” Aside from that Spanish is a fairly simple language to learn.
The only thing that you will find difficult most likely is “el subjuntivo” which means the subjunctive which is one of 3 Spanish “moods”/tenses.
The other Spanish tenses are the “imperativo” (the imperative) and the “indicativo” which is the indicative.
The subjunctive is used to express desires, doubts, the unknown, the abstract, and emotions.
According to a neutral source the subjunctive mood includes many of the same verb tenses as the indicative mood, including the perfect, the past, and the future, which is rarely used in modern Spanish, but good to know for literature.
In my studies and in my reading I have often encountered the subjunctive so I do not believe it to be rare and think it is important to listen carefully when learning Spanish so you can understand when the subjunctive is used.

There is no clear cut answer for this question as it is highly dependent on the person, their natural ability to pick up languages, the resources available, and the dedication to learning the language.
The answer also depends on what you mean by “learn”.
Do mean the basics, general conversation, ability to read and write, or able to carry on a deep conversation?
If one is reasonably dedicated and persistent, then the basics can be learned within 6 months or less.
If you want to be able to carry on a basic conversation (more than just ordering food and asking where the bathroom is), then a year is not unreasonable.
Of course, the more time you dedicate, the more likely you are to progress quickly.
Ultimately, it depends on where you want to be.
If you want to be able to listen to radio, watch TV or movies, then it will most likely take you a few years.
If you are able to go to a Spanish-speaking country for a few months, that will be the best teaching experience you can get.
Forced to speak a language, and you will pick it up much quicker than just listening to language audio books in your car.
As you can see, there is no precise way to predict how long it might take you to learn Spanish to the level you want as there are multiple factors that come into play.
Good luck.

Nothing really, assuming your native language is English or one of the Romance languages.
I'd say Spanish is one of the easiest languages to learn (it's certainly the easiest of the languages I've studied).
Its verb endings are highly regular, and even its relatively few irregular endings tend to follow a pattern.
I'd say the single thing that most trips up English speakers is determining when to use the preterite vs.
the imperfect — and then only really for a few verbs, such as to be, to have, to live.
But Spanish grammar is really a breeze compared to English grammar.
Ditto for spelling, once you learn the alphabet and the handful of letters that sound different from their English counterparts.
Also, a lot of the vocabulary is similar, since so much of the English vocabulary is Latin-based due to the Norman influence following the Norman conquest of England.

So Spanish really isn't particularly difficult, all things considered.
 

Updated: 10.07.2019 — 5:58 pm

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