Can reading improve my writing skills

Can reading improve my writing skills?


No! Reading will not improve your writing skills!
Let me repeat – “Reading a 1000 books will never make you a writer!”
To write well, you need to write a lot! Reading a lot will not make you a good writer!
So what do I get by reading? You might ask?
READING IS GOOD – IN FACT READING IS A TECHNIQUE BY WHICH WE CAN LOAD NEW SOFTWARE INTO OUR BRAIN – KNOWLEDGE – BUT NOTE – READING WILL NOT MAKE YOU A WRITER – I would have become one if that was the case.
I have read tons of stuff for the past 20 odd years, scientific american, Hindu, TOI, Novels, Text Books, Philosophy etc… but I am not a writer, as you can see from my writing, I am an average writer (i think so) many other comments have better writers for this question – one of the used the word ‘repertoire’ I have no clue what that word means! but i know that it is some kind of cache or container, i could guess it form the rest of the sentence formation.

Unless I use that word, it isn’t mine!
Hope that you can understand!


People will often argue that reading the works of others can increase your writing skill because you can consciously dissect what makes certain things succeed or fail in writing, and this is true to an extent.
But then, if it really worked like that, you might expect critics to be the best authors around and although there is a lot of overlap – Charlie Brooker, for instance – this is not necessarily true.
Analysis and criticism are a mixture of hard and soft skills, and so is writing in general.
So how does reading help you write?
In my view, and I would expect there to be some evidence from psychology supporting this but I’ve not checked, a lot of the process of reading and writing is unconscious and intuitive, rather than conscious and analytical, which uses the big, slow, logical cortices at the front of your brain.
Reading the works of others imparts a wealth of unconscious and semi-conscious ideas, characters, intuition on good sentence structure (which we experience as natural rhythm) and other aspects that go into crafting text.
It’s absorbed to some unknown extent and it informs your muse, away from the conscious part of your mind.

We are sensory creatures, and we take in far more information than we are consciously aware of.
The reading process will reflect in your writing, almost certainly for the better.
It will introduce new ideas, words, phrases, and also add layers of inspiration and finesse to your own percolating ideas.


Reading is actually one of the best ways to improve your writing skills.

When you read a lot, you pick up different ideas and writing styles that you can use in your own writing.
Reading is a prime example of learning by example.

Think about when you read.
There are almost certainly words you are encountering for the first time.
Once you pick up the new word, that adds to your vocabulary, allowing you to improve your diction.

If you read a book that you love, you are likely to use certain ideas that take seed in your mind from the story.
Whether it is the characters, plot devices, ideas of setting, or anything else, you will probably find something.

The trick to getting the best out of the book is to read mindfully.
Although you can still learn from reading in a leisurely manner, if you pay attention to the details and the writing, you can have much more insight to apply to your own piece.
I do this particularly before contests so that I can see what kind of material they prefer.

Besides that, reading books specifically about writing is a great idea.
They basically do the above for you, outline the complete analysis of the lesson to be learned from the excerpt, and give you advice from their own experience.
One such example would be Spilling Ink, by Anne Mazer and Ellen Potter.

I hope my answer was useful.


Definitely, yes.

Reading a lot will give you these benefits:
Best of luck!


Definitely.
Reading is the first thing you need to do if you want to be a great writer.

Here are some things that reading helps you improve:
We could go on and on, but those three reasons are enough to pursue reading to help you improve your writing skills.


Good question! Reading does improve your writing skills, because you’re constantly comparing your own writing to what you read, whether you’re aware of it or not.

One way to use reading to deliberately improve your writing is by copying something written by an author you admire.
Copying a work by a famous artist is an old technique to teach painting.
Choose a paragraph of some of your favorite writing, and copy it out, word by word.

You’ll learn about how the author chooses words, which words they use to move the action forward, and which words create context.
You’ll learn about what this author does that’s different from other authors.

Read a large variety of kinds of writing: journalism, sports writing, hip hop lyrics, speeches, young adult fiction.
You’ll hear a broad variety of voices, and discover how different writers tune their message for different audiences.

Keep a notebook and copy down phrases or sentences you enjoy.
Those notes can provide inspiration later.
And keep writing!


I’ll add a very personal way that reading – and I was a voracious reader – changed my ability to write, because there are many ways that reading helps writers.

I remember discovering a little-read author nowadays, Stan Barstow, who had written A Kind of Loving, a book that still has some currency I believe, and I found his writing so deceptively easy to read.
Deceptive because although every sentence could just be read straight through withour stumbling or mis-reading, which gave the impression of simplicity, what he was writing about was thought-provoking to an extreme, at least for me.
In fact it was so deceptively easy to read, I didn’t for some time realise this consciously.

Because his books and writing so intrigued me, I puzzled away at them, until I recognised the skill and artifice that underlay an apparently effortless surface.
At that moment – and it was a moment – I realised that this was something that I would have to be able to achieve.
What I found was that for me this involved re-writing and rewriting – or, at first, reading and rereading – any fiction that I wrote until I could feel that sense of individual words disappearing and a continuous experience of meaning uninterrupted by being at any time conscious of reading.


You can’t see it, but you are building neural pathways in your brain that connect old information to new information and those neural pathways for reading are shared by written communication.

Something that is more tangible is being exposed to other styles, other voices, other forms and other genres through reading.
Reading through Mark Twain’s works might give you more than a good chuckle, but can open up your mind to new ideas since the grand old man was well known for his satire and biting wit.
Read Emily Dickinson and find a thoughtful, insightful soul who writes in symbolic, almost telegraphic style that forces you to dig deep into her words.
Read a bit of Steinbeck or Hemingway or Fitzgerald and be swept away into other worlds, other ways of seeing the world.
All of those exercise your mind and build up background information that you can build on again and again and build more and more neural pathways.

Sorry, I know you can’t see those pathways, but What Reading Does To Your Brain Is Truly Fascinating and Your Brain on Books: Studies Show Reading Causes Measurable Changes in the Brain; reading really molds your brain.

Reading increases your language register.
That simply means that the more words you are exposed to, the larger your vocabulary which makes you smarter.
And makes it possible for you to make better choices as you write so that your writing improves and matures.


Reading is your most brutally honest critic perhaps because it is impersonal or faceless and insensate or unfeeling.
You have the last laugh however when your work invalidates existing opinion or thinking in the field or specialty.
In that case, reading encourages you to raise the bar even higher so that your ideas or thinking are around for quite a while.
This also accelerates the writing process especially when you discover that your ideas or thinking are in demand.
So reading affirms and improves your cognitive skills in general but essentially independent, original, creative and critical thinking skills.

Interestingly also, reading sharpens your critiquing or critical skills thus making you your own first and best critic.
Another way reading improves writing skill is discovered when you comparatively engage with writing techniques or craftsmanship out there.
Even though what you learn from the comparative technical analysis may not be wholly culturally competent in your particular instance, it opens your eyes and mind to what is technically possible in the genre and cultural context of your writing.
For example, reading has currently got me thinking about how thought or reason can be unconventionally extended to children in a visual, concrete thinking culture.

However, technical infrastructure without apposite words and expressions that precisely convey or transmit your intended meaning, logic, knowledge, or understanding you set out to share, is like asking or being asked for direction to the moon! So reading provides the extended range or repertoire of vocabulary you need to express your craftsmanship.

1h��0�s>


Writing is like any other skill.
Practice makes better.
As some people already mentioned reading will dramatically improve your writing skills,vocabulary skills, and even thinking skills.

So yes, reading can help your writing skills dramatically.
The more you read the better your writing skills would be.
It would help you a lot more if you take notes of what you read.
This will drill what you read into your mind even more.

For More Powerful Information Like This One Please Visit Me AT:
Prosperity Life Hacks – Unleash Your Potential


Reading develops your awareness of language.
You absorb a facility with words and sentence structure in the most enjoyable and effortless way.
It’s wonderful to read great writers, but it’s just as helpful to read whatever you like for pleasure: magazines, suspense novels, science fiction, newspapers.

Even better, start to consciously analyze why some writing works for you.
Notice how the writer uses language to touch your curiosity or emotions or self-interest.
Or persuades you to a point of view or convinces you to buy something.
Think: How did he or she do it?
And it’s useful to start a personal file of writing you like.
Some of the finest writers begin by imitating their favorite author.
If most of your writing is practical—like emails or letters or reports—collect effective examples of this type.
Then experiment with modeling your own writing on these samples.


You can’t play rock n roll if you’ve never listened to rock n roll.

You can’t write a good poem if you never read good poems, and you can’t write one that will get published by today’s publishers if you’ve only read poets who wrote hundreds of years ago, although you can’t write anything good if you haven’t read them as well as the new ones.

You can’t write a good short story if you haven’t read some really good short stories by people who know how to do it.
If you read them, you can get a sense of how they do it.
You can get ideas from them, too.
One day you’re sitting there thinking, “I have no ideas for a story.
” Then you pick up Raymond Carver, and you read a couple stories.
Suddenly, you have an idea of how to use some experience you’ve had, how to frame it using suggestion and dialogue and the withholding of certain information.

Last week I wrote a poem about Rilke.
Last night, I read some more Rilke.
Later last night I rewrote the poem about Rilke.
ETC.


Thanks for the A2A.

Some people seem to think so, but I’ve yet to see that actually do anything for someone’s writing.

Let me tell you how I started writing, in each point of my life when that was actually a thing.

I’ve been writing, off and on, since I was old enough to pick up a pencil, and I used to read when I was a kid.
Reading didn’t help my writing back then.
I probably read, at that point, more than I wrote.

In high-school, I took creative writing, and began yet again.
I even took British Literature at the time, and guess what? Reading in that class didn’t help my writing either.

When I finally visited the idea of becoming a writer, much much later, I didn’t pick up a book and start reading again, I sat down and started writing for the purpose of eventually publishing.

I looked online to learn structure, format, and how to properly write a number of different things.
None of that process involved reading any books.

Today, I’m honing my craft into a better form, and in the time I’ve actually made writing my ultimate goal, I’ve read exactly zero books from other people.

Instead, I’ve actually sat down, and written, and edited, and re-checked my work, and actually given my work critical thought in regards to how I can word things better, how I can put together a scene, what to put in what chapter, etc.

In short, I’m improving my writing, by actually writing.
And that right there is why I always tell people, if they want to get better at writing, they have to actually write; because my personal history is all the proof I need to show that reading will not get you there.

Plenty of people disagree with me, and you know what, that’s fine, they don’t have to agree with me, but they haven’t seen what I’ve seen, because if they did, they’d say the same thing I’m saying now.


Thank you for asking, Justice, and sorry for the late response.

There are a number of ways that reading improves one’s writing skills, in my experience.

The first way in which reading will improve one’s writing is by expanding one’s knowledge base.
By growing one’s knowledge, one improves the ability to communicate and write, generally speaking.

The more important factor is that one’s writing itself (style wise) will develop, particularly if one seeks to imitate the writing style of authors.
However, that is a double-edged sword.
If one reads excellently-written works and strives to imitate them, then one will improve vocabulary, writing style, ability to communicate, etc.
However, if one reads poorly written works consistently (once in a while isn’t an issue) then it starts to influence the way one writes- but not a good way.

The essential principle is that, in a nutshell, the people you interact with and the books you read determine who you become.

Hope that helps!


If you apply the tricks of the trade you observe when reading the work of others, reading can definitely improve your writing skills.
It has helped me enormously.
It is the single most important piece of advice (apart from actually writing) that I give to people.
It is a piece of advice I read a long time ago, in the 1970s or 1980s before the internet, on how to become a good writer.
Read what you want to write, is what it said and that is what I say.
Some people disagree but I am not sure how you can learn to write fantasy, for example, if all you read is autobiographies.
They are two different genres of literature and utilize two different kinds of research and writing techniques.
This is not to say that one must limit one’s reading to a single genre.
Variety is good for the soul—and the brain.
But it is very difficult to write something you don’t know about.
Reading what you want to write is a pleasant way to get to know what you want to write, right?


Terrific answers so far! Another thing that reading does for me is to trigger ideas for my own writing – especially fiction in which I am a newbie (although I’ve had 35 nonfiction and humour books published so far.
)
It’s very useful to analyse plots and sub-plots and see how other authors build suspense, create cliff hangers and various other devices to keep readers gripped.
It’s also useful to warn you of some of the pitfalls, when you read a novel that disappoints you in some ways.
Why did it disappoint you? How would you have written it better?
Finally, it’s a great way to learn how to create and sustain interesting characters, and to avoid making the classic newbie-novelist goofs like using too many adjectives and adverbs.


Reading gives the unconscious mind an opportunity to delve into a whole other world.
Exposing yourself to different genres, voices, and styles teaches you rhythm, expectations, and cultures.
Characters, plot, and themes get swallowed up, mixed around, and pushed into the conscious mind as something new.

Just as your body needs food and water to survive, your imagination will wither away and die if you deprive it of stories, if you let it languish in indolence.

Great artists, athletes, musicians, and speakers don’t stop consuming their media just because they participate in it.
Artists study the greats and their own contemporaries.
Athletes watch tapes and analyze strategies used in recent games and ones in the past.
Musicians study chords and melodies until they can spot them in pieces of all kind.
Speakers listen to storytellers and politicians and comedians.
Writers read.

By studying those who’ve come before, you can learn from their mistakes and their successes.
You can see how they built their characters and worlds.
You can improve your own writing with a trick you learned from Dumas or J.
K.
Rowling or correct a mistake you saw Dean Koontz or John Green make.

A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.

G.
R.
R.
Martin
Don’t let your mind get dull.
Read.


Absolutely it can.
Not only will it give you a greater vocabulary, which will always improve your writing, it will also expose you to different styles of writing (if you read broadly) that you can draw from.

The more you read, the more you learn about writing, even if you’re not conscious of it.
You’ll see phrases that don’t work and phrases that are so clever you wish you’d thought of them.
You’ll discover pacing – what works and what doesn’t.

Read acclaimed books and read terrible books.
Learn from both.
When you read a terrible book, think about why it was terrible.
Look at how characters are described, how they move through the story, what they learn along the way.
Make notes of things that really speak to you and revisit them often – why did that description resonate? What was it about that metaphor that worked? What made you love that passage?


When it comes to style and lexical richness, the research tends to show that reading is what is building your writing skills :
This research paper from linguist Stephen Krashen compiles many studies proving that case.

In the answers to this question, some people argue that if it was the case, people who are reading the most should then be the best authors.
Hence, critics should be better writer than authors.
Yet, it is obviously true that Sainte-Beuve, once Hugo’s best friend and the most renowned French critic of his time, wasn’t half as talented as his friend of genius.

Here, I would say that the way one is reading—and especially the attention to detail in terms of words, meanings or rhythms—is playing a huge role in the making of a good writer.
Running through a museum spending half a second in front of every painting won’t enable you to know anything about painting, but staying in front of one masterpiece for an hour, noticing each brush stroke and each subtle nuance, is what will form your eye.
Victor Hugo was known to be a slow reader as a child; maybe because he was striving to grasp anything that could be collected from any text.

Also, I would argue that invention always starts with imitation.
Picasso, who once famously said “good artists copy; great artists steal”, couldn’t agree more on this point.
I have delved much deeper into that point right here, trying to show the mechanism linking imitation to invention—and thus, reading to creative writing.


If I answer this based on my experience particularly, then, yes it does.
For me, if I come across a beautiful story, article, passage, phrase or even a word, my brain stores it for future use.

All voracious readers might not be good writers but the vice versa is not quite apt.
You would find good writers to be great readers.
Even one is not a writer but writing can be beneficial in lots many ways:
Reading consists of two parts as such – comprehension of the reading material and memory to store the material read.
While reading something, one might come across new words, proverbs, different writing style or expression of emotions in a new and unique way.
One can easily get inspired with the material read.

Hence, to improve your writing skills, it is really recommended to read everything good whatever comes your way.
From newspapers to articles, magazines to pamphlets, read everything that comes your way.


I would go one step further, as you read, do not read just silently but read out loud.
And listen to great authors with audible books, and great speeches on tape.
Excellent writing is the synthesis of multiple talents and skills.
Reading and listening to superb authors and excellent writing enables your brain to see and hear and thus remember and emulate.
For example do not just listen to Poe’s the Raven….
listen to Basil Rathbone, as you read…
and then read it aloud yourself.
The more senses you can use and involve, the greater the impact on your brain and the retention of your memory.

To improve, good players often watch and then model, mimic, imitate closely the superior athletes that excel in their discipline to improve.
It works.
re: JHS


hello…
I will be glad to help u out….

well firstly u should knw the importance of reading….

reading is such an exercise of brain … that stimulates ur capacity of grasping and learning more… it helps u widen ur knowledge horizon…
the more u read the more u become acclimatize with ur surrounding…
todays era… speaks well about a person who is an all rounder … be it speaking or writing….

the more u read the more frequent u get similar with new words… new terminology… new ideas…
and u should make it a point to note down the meanings of the same….
when u do this… u learn how to frame good impacting sentences…
I am damn sure ,…once u read…….
really good novels… or English news papers … u will feel like penning down some of ur creativity……
so enjoy!!
thank u  :)


When I decided I wanted to be a writer, I knew I needed to read other authors.

I read a wide range.
Studied their styles and eventually developed my own which is reflected in my work.

Reading other authors (who interest you) gives you a subtle guideline to follow.

How they tell their story.

How they speak through their characters.

How they think through their characters.

How they show through their writing.

It’s all part and parcel of the learning process of writing.
I’ve never quit reading and over the years my style has changed and will continue to do so.
But the thing is, is that it is my style.
It’s not replicated.

You’ll find your own style through reading and through writing each day.
It’s a natural progression.


Yes – reading will most certainly improve your writing skills.

But you also need to write, write, write.
Write everyday, even when you don’t want to.
Write.
Did I say write everyday? Well, I’ll say it again: write everyday.

Writing is a much tougher endeavor than people realize, but it is so rewarding.
Even the office memo or set of direction can be better.
But it takes practice to be a better writer.
So do it, and do it often.


No, only reading won't help you to write even a little!
It will surely help you to build a strong vocabulary.

You might feel like reading is helping you to write better but it won't.

I have a secret that will help you to write better and I will reveal my secret to you guys for free.

1…2… 3…
And it is Start Writing,
This might seem pretty obvious to you but people actually don't execute this.
And they keep on asking how that I can improve my writing skills but never try to write even a single sentence!
So, my advice to all those people who seek advice to write better I would suggest all those friends to start writing from now.

Thank you all for reading my answer _/\_
Have a nice ;)


Can reading improve my writing skills?


No! Reading will not improve your writing skills!
Let me repeat – “Reading a 1000 books will never make you a writer!”
To write well, you need to write a lot! Reading a lot will not make you a good writer!
So what do I get by reading? You might ask?
READING IS GOOD – IN FACT READING IS A TECHNIQUE BY WHICH WE CAN LOAD NEW SOFTWARE INTO OUR BRAIN – KNOWLEDGE – BUT NOTE – READING WILL NOT MAKE YOU A WRITER – I would have become one if that was the case.
I have read tons of stuff for the past 20 odd years, scientific american, Hindu, TOI, Novels, Text Books, Philosophy etc… but I am not a writer, as you can see from my writing, I am an average writer (i think so) many other comments have better writers for this question – one of the used the word ‘repertoire’ I have no clue what that word means! but i know that it is some kind of cache or container, i could guess it form the rest of the sentence formation.

Unless I use that word, it isn’t mine!
Hope that you can understand!


People will often argue that reading the works of others can increase your writing skill because you can consciously dissect what makes certain things succeed or fail in writing, and this is true to an extent.
But then, if it really worked like that, you might expect critics to be the best authors around and although there is a lot of overlap – Charlie Brooker, for instance – this is not necessarily true.
Analysis and criticism are a mixture of hard and soft skills, and so is writing in general.
So how does reading help you write?
In my view, and I would expect there to be some evidence from psychology supporting this but I’ve not checked, a lot of the process of reading and writing is unconscious and intuitive, rather than conscious and analytical, which uses the big, slow, logical cortices at the front of your brain.
Reading the works of others imparts a wealth of unconscious and semi-conscious ideas, characters, intuition on good sentence structure (which we experience as natural rhythm) and other aspects that go into crafting text.
It’s absorbed to some unknown extent and it informs your muse, away from the conscious part of your mind.

We are sensory creatures, and we take in far more information than we are consciously aware of.
The reading process will reflect in your writing, almost certainly for the better.
It will introduce new ideas, words, phrases, and also add layers of inspiration and finesse to your own percolating ideas.


Reading is actually one of the best ways to improve your writing skills.

When you read a lot, you pick up different ideas and writing styles that you can use in your own writing.
Reading is a prime example of learning by example.

Think about when you read.
There are almost certainly words you are encountering for the first time.
Once you pick up the new word, that adds to your vocabulary, allowing you to improve your diction.

If you read a book that you love, you are likely to use certain ideas that take seed in your mind from the story.
Whether it is the characters, plot devices, ideas of setting, or anything else, you will probably find something.

The trick to getting the best out of the book is to read mindfully.
Although you can still learn from reading in a leisurely manner, if you pay attention to the details and the writing, you can have much more insight to apply to your own piece.
I do this particularly before contests so that I can see what kind of material they prefer.

Besides that, reading books specifically about writing is a great idea.
They basically do the above for you, outline the complete analysis of the lesson to be learned from the excerpt, and give you advice from their own experience.
One such example would be Spilling Ink, by Anne Mazer and Ellen Potter.

I hope my answer was useful.


Definitely, yes.

Reading a lot will give you these benefits:
Best of luck!


Definitely.
Reading is the first thing you need to do if you want to be a great writer.

Here are some things that reading helps you improve:
We could go on and on, but those three reasons are enough to pursue reading to help you improve your writing skills.


Good question! Reading does improve your writing skills, because you’re constantly comparing your own writing to what you read, whether you’re aware of it or not.

One way to use reading to deliberately improve your writing is by copying something written by an author you admire.
Copying a work by a famous artist is an old technique to teach painting.
Choose a paragraph of some of your favorite writing, and copy it out, word by word.

You’ll learn about how the author chooses words, which words they use to move the action forward, and which words create context.
You’ll learn about what this author does that’s different from other authors.

Read a large variety of kinds of writing: journalism, sports writing, hip hop lyrics, speeches, young adult fiction.
You’ll hear a broad variety of voices, and discover how different writers tune their message for different audiences.

Keep a notebook and copy down phrases or sentences you enjoy.
Those notes can provide inspiration later.
And keep writing!


I’ll add a very personal way that reading – and I was a voracious reader – changed my ability to write, because there are many ways that reading helps writers.

I remember discovering a little-read author nowadays, Stan Barstow, who had written A Kind of Loving, a book that still has some currency I believe, and I found his writing so deceptively easy to read.
Deceptive because although every sentence could just be read straight through withour stumbling or mis-reading, which gave the impression of simplicity, what he was writing about was thought-provoking to an extreme, at least for me.
In fact it was so deceptively easy to read, I didn’t for some time realise this consciously.

Because his books and writing so intrigued me, I puzzled away at them, until I recognised the skill and artifice that underlay an apparently effortless surface.
At that moment – and it was a moment – I realised that this was something that I would have to be able to achieve.
What I found was that for me this involved re-writing and rewriting – or, at first, reading and rereading – any fiction that I wrote until I could feel that sense of individual words disappearing and a continuous experience of meaning uninterrupted by being at any time conscious of reading.


You can’t see it, but you are building neural pathways in your brain that connect old information to new information and those neural pathways for reading are shared by written communication.

Something that is more tangible is being exposed to other styles, other voices, other forms and other genres through reading.
Reading through Mark Twain’s works might give you more than a good chuckle, but can open up your mind to new ideas since the grand old man was well known for his satire and biting wit.
Read Emily Dickinson and find a thoughtful, insightful soul who writes in symbolic, almost telegraphic style that forces you to dig deep into her words.
Read a bit of Steinbeck or Hemingway or Fitzgerald and be swept away into other worlds, other ways of seeing the world.
All of those exercise your mind and build up background information that you can build on again and again and build more and more neural pathways.

Sorry, I know you can’t see those pathways, but What Reading Does To Your Brain Is Truly Fascinating and Your Brain on Books: Studies Show Reading Causes Measurable Changes in the Brain; reading really molds your brain.

Reading increases your language register.
That simply means that the more words you are exposed to, the larger your vocabulary which makes you smarter.
And makes it possible for you to make better choices as you write so that your writing improves and matures.


Reading is your most brutally honest critic perhaps because it is impersonal or faceless and insensate or unfeeling.
You have the last laugh however when your work invalidates existing opinion or thinking in the field or specialty.
In that case, reading encourages you to raise the bar even higher so that your ideas or thinking are around for quite a while.
This also accelerates the writing process especially when you discover that your ideas or thinking are in demand.
So reading affirms and improves your cognitive skills in general but essentially independent, original, creative and critical thinking skills.

Interestingly also, reading sharpens your critiquing or critical skills thus making you your own first and best critic.
Another way reading improves writing skill is discovered when you comparatively engage with writing techniques or craftsmanship out there.
Even though what you learn from the comparative technical analysis may not be wholly culturally competent in your particular instance, it opens your eyes and mind to what is technically possible in the genre and cultural context of your writing.
For example, reading has currently got me thinking about how thought or reason can be unconventionally extended to children in a visual, concrete thinking culture.

However, technical infrastructure without apposite words and expressions that precisely convey or transmit your intended meaning, logic, knowledge, or understanding you set out to share, is like asking or being asked for direction to the moon! So reading provides the extended range or repertoire of vocabulary you need to express your craftsmanship.

1h��0�s>


Writing is like any other skill.
Practice makes better.
As some people already mentioned reading will dramatically improve your writing skills,vocabulary skills, and even thinking skills.

So yes, reading can help your writing skills dramatically.
The more you read the better your writing skills would be.
It would help you a lot more if you take notes of what you read.
This will drill what you read into your mind even more.

For More Powerful Information Like This One Please Visit Me AT:
Prosperity Life Hacks – Unleash Your Potential


Reading develops your awareness of language.
You absorb a facility with words and sentence structure in the most enjoyable and effortless way.
It’s wonderful to read great writers, but it’s just as helpful to read whatever you like for pleasure: magazines, suspense novels, science fiction, newspapers.

Even better, start to consciously analyze why some writing works for you.
Notice how the writer uses language to touch your curiosity or emotions or self-interest.
Or persuades you to a point of view or convinces you to buy something.
Think: How did he or she do it?
And it’s useful to start a personal file of writing you like.
Some of the finest writers begin by imitating their favorite author.
If most of your writing is practical—like emails or letters or reports—collect effective examples of this type.
Then experiment with modeling your own writing on these samples.


You can’t play rock n roll if you’ve never listened to rock n roll.

You can’t write a good poem if you never read good poems, and you can’t write one that will get published by today’s publishers if you’ve only read poets who wrote hundreds of years ago, although you can’t write anything good if you haven’t read them as well as the new ones.

You can’t write a good short story if you haven’t read some really good short stories by people who know how to do it.
If you read them, you can get a sense of how they do it.
You can get ideas from them, too.
One day you’re sitting there thinking, “I have no ideas for a story.
” Then you pick up Raymond Carver, and you read a couple stories.
Suddenly, you have an idea of how to use some experience you’ve had, how to frame it using suggestion and dialogue and the withholding of certain information.

Last week I wrote a poem about Rilke.
Last night, I read some more Rilke.
Later last night I rewrote the poem about Rilke.
ETC.


Thanks for the A2A.

Some people seem to think so, but I’ve yet to see that actually do anything for someone’s writing.

Let me tell you how I started writing, in each point of my life when that was actually a thing.

I’ve been writing, off and on, since I was old enough to pick up a pencil, and I used to read when I was a kid.
Reading didn’t help my writing back then.
I probably read, at that point, more than I wrote.

In high-school, I took creative writing, and began yet again.
I even took British Literature at the time, and guess what? Reading in that class didn’t help my writing either.

When I finally visited the idea of becoming a writer, much much later, I didn’t pick up a book and start reading again, I sat down and started writing for the purpose of eventually publishing.

I looked online to learn structure, format, and how to properly write a number of different things.
None of that process involved reading any books.

Today, I’m honing my craft into a better form, and in the time I’ve actually made writing my ultimate goal, I’ve read exactly zero books from other people.

Instead, I’ve actually sat down, and written, and edited, and re-checked my work, and actually given my work critical thought in regards to how I can word things better, how I can put together a scene, what to put in what chapter, etc.

In short, I’m improving my writing, by actually writing.
And that right there is why I always tell people, if they want to get better at writing, they have to actually write; because my personal history is all the proof I need to show that reading will not get you there.

Plenty of people disagree with me, and you know what, that’s fine, they don’t have to agree with me, but they haven’t seen what I’ve seen, because if they did, they’d say the same thing I’m saying now.


Thank you for asking, Justice, and sorry for the late response.

There are a number of ways that reading improves one’s writing skills, in my experience.

The first way in which reading will improve one’s writing is by expanding one’s knowledge base.
By growing one’s knowledge, one improves the ability to communicate and write, generally speaking.

The more important factor is that one’s writing itself (style wise) will develop, particularly if one seeks to imitate the writing style of authors.
However, that is a double-edged sword.
If one reads excellently-written works and strives to imitate them, then one will improve vocabulary, writing style, ability to communicate, etc.
However, if one reads poorly written works consistently (once in a while isn’t an issue) then it starts to influence the way one writes- but not a good way.

The essential principle is that, in a nutshell, the people you interact with and the books you read determine who you become.

Hope that helps!


If you apply the tricks of the trade you observe when reading the work of others, reading can definitely improve your writing skills.
It has helped me enormously.
It is the single most important piece of advice (apart from actually writing) that I give to people.
It is a piece of advice I read a long time ago, in the 1970s or 1980s before the internet, on how to become a good writer.
Read what you want to write, is what it said and that is what I say.
Some people disagree but I am not sure how you can learn to write fantasy, for example, if all you read is autobiographies.
They are two different genres of literature and utilize two different kinds of research and writing techniques.
This is not to say that one must limit one’s reading to a single genre.
Variety is good for the soul—and the brain.
But it is very difficult to write something you don’t know about.
Reading what you want to write is a pleasant way to get to know what you want to write, right?


Terrific answers so far! Another thing that reading does for me is to trigger ideas for my own writing – especially fiction in which I am a newbie (although I’ve had 35 nonfiction and humour books published so far.
)
It’s very useful to analyse plots and sub-plots and see how other authors build suspense, create cliff hangers and various other devices to keep readers gripped.
It’s also useful to warn you of some of the pitfalls, when you read a novel that disappoints you in some ways.
Why did it disappoint you? How would you have written it better?
Finally, it’s a great way to learn how to create and sustain interesting characters, and to avoid making the classic newbie-novelist goofs like using too many adjectives and adverbs.


Reading gives the unconscious mind an opportunity to delve into a whole other world.
Exposing yourself to different genres, voices, and styles teaches you rhythm, expectations, and cultures.
Characters, plot, and themes get swallowed up, mixed around, and pushed into the conscious mind as something new.

Just as your body needs food and water to survive, your imagination will wither away and die if you deprive it of stories, if you let it languish in indolence.

Great artists, athletes, musicians, and speakers don’t stop consuming their media just because they participate in it.
Artists study the greats and their own contemporaries.
Athletes watch tapes and analyze strategies used in recent games and ones in the past.
Musicians study chords and melodies until they can spot them in pieces of all kind.
Speakers listen to storytellers and politicians and comedians.
Writers read.

By studying those who’ve come before, you can learn from their mistakes and their successes.
You can see how they built their characters and worlds.
You can improve your own writing with a trick you learned from Dumas or J.
K.
Rowling or correct a mistake you saw Dean Koontz or John Green make.

A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.

G.
R.
R.
Martin
Don’t let your mind get dull.
Read.


Absolutely it can.
Not only will it give you a greater vocabulary, which will always improve your writing, it will also expose you to different styles of writing (if you read broadly) that you can draw from.

The more you read, the more you learn about writing, even if you’re not conscious of it.
You’ll see phrases that don’t work and phrases that are so clever you wish you’d thought of them.
You’ll discover pacing – what works and what doesn’t.

Read acclaimed books and read terrible books.
Learn from both.
When you read a terrible book, think about why it was terrible.
Look at how characters are described, how they move through the story, what they learn along the way.
Make notes of things that really speak to you and revisit them often – why did that description resonate? What was it about that metaphor that worked? What made you love that passage?


When it comes to style and lexical richness, the research tends to show that reading is what is building your writing skills :
This research paper from linguist Stephen Krashen compiles many studies proving that case.

In the answers to this question, some people argue that if it was the case, people who are reading the most should then be the best authors.
Hence, critics should be better writer than authors.
Yet, it is obviously true that Sainte-Beuve, once Hugo’s best friend and the most renowned French critic of his time, wasn’t half as talented as his friend of genius.

Here, I would say that the way one is reading—and especially the attention to detail in terms of words, meanings or rhythms—is playing a huge role in the making of a good writer.
Running through a museum spending half a second in front of every painting won’t enable you to know anything about painting, but staying in front of one masterpiece for an hour, noticing each brush stroke and each subtle nuance, is what will form your eye.
Victor Hugo was known to be a slow reader as a child; maybe because he was striving to grasp anything that could be collected from any text.

Also, I would argue that invention always starts with imitation.
Picasso, who once famously said “good artists copy; great artists steal”, couldn’t agree more on this point.
I have delved much deeper into that point right here, trying to show the mechanism linking imitation to invention—and thus, reading to creative writing.


If I answer this based on my experience particularly, then, yes it does.
For me, if I come across a beautiful story, article, passage, phrase or even a word, my brain stores it for future use.

All voracious readers might not be good writers but the vice versa is not quite apt.
You would find good writers to be great readers.
Even one is not a writer but writing can be beneficial in lots many ways:
Reading consists of two parts as such – comprehension of the reading material and memory to store the material read.
While reading something, one might come across new words, proverbs, different writing style or expression of emotions in a new and unique way.
One can easily get inspired with the material read.

Hence, to improve your writing skills, it is really recommended to read everything good whatever comes your way.
From newspapers to articles, magazines to pamphlets, read everything that comes your way.


I would go one step further, as you read, do not read just silently but read out loud.
And listen to great authors with audible books, and great speeches on tape.
Excellent writing is the synthesis of multiple talents and skills.
Reading and listening to superb authors and excellent writing enables your brain to see and hear and thus remember and emulate.
For example do not just listen to Poe’s the Raven….
listen to Basil Rathbone, as you read…
and then read it aloud yourself.
The more senses you can use and involve, the greater the impact on your brain and the retention of your memory.

To improve, good players often watch and then model, mimic, imitate closely the superior athletes that excel in their discipline to improve.
It works.
re: JHS


hello…
I will be glad to help u out….

well firstly u should knw the importance of reading….

reading is such an exercise of brain … that stimulates ur capacity of grasping and learning more… it helps u widen ur knowledge horizon…
the more u read the more u become acclimatize with ur surrounding…
todays era… speaks well about a person who is an all rounder … be it speaking or writing….

the more u read the more frequent u get similar with new words… new terminology… new ideas…
and u should make it a point to note down the meanings of the same….
when u do this… u learn how to frame good impacting sentences…
I am damn sure ,…once u read…….
really good novels… or English news papers … u will feel like penning down some of ur creativity……
so enjoy!!
thank u  :)


When I decided I wanted to be a writer, I knew I needed to read other authors.

I read a wide range.
Studied their styles and eventually developed my own which is reflected in my work.

Reading other authors (who interest you) gives you a subtle guideline to follow.

How they tell their story.

How they speak through their characters.

How they think through their characters.

How they show through their writing.

It’s all part and parcel of the learning process of writing.
I’ve never quit reading and over the years my style has changed and will continue to do so.
But the thing is, is that it is my style.
It’s not replicated.

You’ll find your own style through reading and through writing each day.
It’s a natural progression.


Yes – reading will most certainly improve your writing skills.

But you also need to write, write, write.
Write everyday, even when you don’t want to.
Write.
Did I say write everyday? Well, I’ll say it again: write everyday.

Writing is a much tougher endeavor than people realize, but it is so rewarding.
Even the office memo or set of direction can be better.
But it takes practice to be a better writer.
So do it, and do it often.


No, only reading won't help you to write even a little!
It will surely help you to build a strong vocabulary.

You might feel like reading is helping you to write better but it won't.

I have a secret that will help you to write better and I will reveal my secret to you guys for free.

1…2… 3…
And it is Start Writing,
This might seem pretty obvious to you but people actually don't execute this.
And they keep on asking how that I can improve my writing skills but never try to write even a single sentence!
So, my advice to all those people who seek advice to write better I would suggest all those friends to start writing from now.

Thank you all for reading my answer _/\_
Have a nice ;)

Updated: 09.06.2019 — 3:07 pm

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