Can female writers write good male characters

Can female writers write good male characters?


My first instinct to this question was psh, tsk, duh of course we can.
And, after reading the other anwers and not really being impressed by the examples, I paused to think about it.
It's actually a great question.

A lot of the very popular female authors of course have male leads.
Some are strong, most are okay, many are weird pathetic crybabies.
I'm not going to give specific examples because clearly they would be opinion; no matter how correct and educated they are.
Fill in your own blanks.

Male leads or even secondary characters written by female authors have three roads at the beginning of their lives: Reflective Overcompensation, Underwhelming Unbalance, and Researched Body-mind.
They can travel between them, but they'll keep to one for the majority.

Of course all authors, male and female, struggle with correctly representing the opposite gender and every character will have their mistakes or plot holes written in to them, but a good author will research people constantly and those lessons will be respected and reflected in their characters.

All stories have their character flaws; there will be elements of each character road in all of them, but keep this in mind:
A good fiction author, someone who creates everything in their world as best they can without stealing from others or just hashing out derivative trope, is creating an entire world.
The landscape, the weather, the cities, the people, the cultures, the languages, the creatures, the emotions, the destinies, the civil issues, the wars, the struggles…everything that makes up a real world has to be forged from the ground up.

Give us a break if there are a few plotholes and weaknesses.


It’s a rare book that doesn’t have characters of the opposite sex to the writer.

Female writing about men or visa versa carries the risk of over emphasis on what we perceive as differences.
The reality is there aren’t that many differences.
There are strong and weak in both sexes, there are bigots and liberals, there are flirts and asexuals.

Unless it’s important to the story in some way, write without considering sexuality as a major issue.
A adventure story for example will have a strong central character whether they are male or female.
Concentrate on that, not on their sex.
Any small differences should be nuanced rather than highlighted.
Not all women scream at spiders.
Not all men refuse to cry.

In a romance the differences become a little more significant, but again a good writer will quell the desire to write about ‘swooning girls’ and ‘tall dark strangers’.

If you want to know how to write characters accurately, watch real people.
Watch how they interact in normal activities.
Sexuality is mostly irrelevant.


Absolutely.

I argue in Shadow Woman: The True Creator of Sherlock Holmes, that it was Louise Conan Doyle, not Arthur, who created Sherlock Holmes and wrote the early adventures.

Now the roles are reversed on me.
I’m writing a series of mysteries starring Louise, even before she met Arthur, in which she’s using the Sherlockian skills that must have been innate to her.

I think my seniority helps me since it has given me more time than most to study humanity from all angles.
In fact, I can’t imagine I could have (or would have) written of a female lead character when I was younger.

Louise, though, being a better observer of mankind that most anyone else, managed to create Holmes when she was in her twenties.

I suspect that anyone trying to write successfully across genders will have to sincerely understand and appreciate the differences that unite us all.


Female writers have the tendency to ‘romanticize’ men character to a point beyond reality.

It doesn’t mean EVERY women writer do this.
There very good examples about fabulous characters written by women.
Not only men (adult), but boys and ancient.

Men writers also have failures written women characters.
Mostly showing the extremes of it and little about the ‘real’.

There a re lately many books oriented to ‘women’… ’cause despite it have male characters, men don’t like it.

Me, one of my all time favorites is Agatha Christie.
Extraordinary!
Mary Shelley is another I can applaud.

But Rowling, Stephanie Meyer and EL James… please! →(Harry Potter, Twilight, 50 grades of.
.
)


Definitely.
Here are a few examples.

1.
RJ Palacio – Wonder
Not only did she create the character of August Pullman, but she made his innocence seen in his thoughts.
It's a bestseller.

2.
Jhumpa Lahiri – The lowland
Tale of two boys in Communist Bengal.

3.
Mary Shelly – Frankenstein
Entire classic written from male point of view.

4.
Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights
Heathcliffe
5.
JK Rowling- Harry Potter series
Harry.
And the phenomenal change in Harry's life and thought process throughout the years.

And a special mention .

JK Rowling for Severus Snape.
Always.


Certainly.
My mom is a writer in Marathi and Hindi language.
She has developed some talk humane male protagonist.

So do some of brilliant lady authors eg McNaughton, Austen, Harper Lee, etc.
A writer peeps into psychology of human and observes and understand the human nature.
No one is super hero or heroine.
If a writer keeps all characters natural, else justifies superability all characters can turn out beautiful.


Dorothy Sayers created Lord Peter Wimsey, one of the best detectives in fiction (ironically, the best of the books are those in which Peter’s romantic interest Harriet Vane does not appear.
I am happy to argue, in fact, that one of the Harriet-free books, The Nine Tailors, is one of, if not the best English-language mystery novel ever written, precisely because unlike Christie and many contemporaries, you have all the information Peter does and all you need to solve the mystery.
No cheating with hidden information.
)


One of the short stories I wrote and submitted to be considered for admission to Washington University’s Writers Program was told from a first-person teen male’s perspective.

I got admitted and with full tuition remission.
I earned my MFA in fiction writing three years later.
While I was in grad school, St.
Louis Home
magazine published the same story and paid me $100 for it.

So the answer for this female is…yes.


Can female writers write good male characters?


My first instinct to this question was psh, tsk, duh of course we can.
And, after reading the other anwers and not really being impressed by the examples, I paused to think about it.
It's actually a great question.

A lot of the very popular female authors of course have male leads.
Some are strong, most are okay, many are weird pathetic crybabies.
I'm not going to give specific examples because clearly they would be opinion; no matter how correct and educated they are.
Fill in your own blanks.

Male leads or even secondary characters written by female authors have three roads at the beginning of their lives: Reflective Overcompensation, Underwhelming Unbalance, and Researched Body-mind.
They can travel between them, but they'll keep to one for the majority.

Of course all authors, male and female, struggle with correctly representing the opposite gender and every character will have their mistakes or plot holes written in to them, but a good author will research people constantly and those lessons will be respected and reflected in their characters.

All stories have their character flaws; there will be elements of each character road in all of them, but keep this in mind:
A good fiction author, someone who creates everything in their world as best they can without stealing from others or just hashing out derivative trope, is creating an entire world.
The landscape, the weather, the cities, the people, the cultures, the languages, the creatures, the emotions, the destinies, the civil issues, the wars, the struggles…everything that makes up a real world has to be forged from the ground up.

Give us a break if there are a few plotholes and weaknesses.


It’s a rare book that doesn’t have characters of the opposite sex to the writer.

Female writing about men or visa versa carries the risk of over emphasis on what we perceive as differences.
The reality is there aren’t that many differences.
There are strong and weak in both sexes, there are bigots and liberals, there are flirts and asexuals.

Unless it’s important to the story in some way, write without considering sexuality as a major issue.
A adventure story for example will have a strong central character whether they are male or female.
Concentrate on that, not on their sex.
Any small differences should be nuanced rather than highlighted.
Not all women scream at spiders.
Not all men refuse to cry.

In a romance the differences become a little more significant, but again a good writer will quell the desire to write about ‘swooning girls’ and ‘tall dark strangers’.

If you want to know how to write characters accurately, watch real people.
Watch how they interact in normal activities.
Sexuality is mostly irrelevant.


Absolutely.

I argue in Shadow Woman: The True Creator of Sherlock Holmes, that it was Louise Conan Doyle, not Arthur, who created Sherlock Holmes and wrote the early adventures.

Now the roles are reversed on me.
I’m writing a series of mysteries starring Louise, even before she met Arthur, in which she’s using the Sherlockian skills that must have been innate to her.

I think my seniority helps me since it has given me more time than most to study humanity from all angles.
In fact, I can’t imagine I could have (or would have) written of a female lead character when I was younger.

Louise, though, being a better observer of mankind that most anyone else, managed to create Holmes when she was in her twenties.

I suspect that anyone trying to write successfully across genders will have to sincerely understand and appreciate the differences that unite us all.


Female writers have the tendency to ‘romanticize’ men character to a point beyond reality.

It doesn’t mean EVERY women writer do this.
There very good examples about fabulous characters written by women.
Not only men (adult), but boys and ancient.

Men writers also have failures written women characters.
Mostly showing the extremes of it and little about the ‘real’.

There a re lately many books oriented to ‘women’… ’cause despite it have male characters, men don’t like it.

Me, one of my all time favorites is Agatha Christie.
Extraordinary!
Mary Shelley is another I can applaud.

But Rowling, Stephanie Meyer and EL James… please! →(Harry Potter, Twilight, 50 grades of.
.
)


Definitely.
Here are a few examples.

1.
RJ Palacio – Wonder
Not only did she create the character of August Pullman, but she made his innocence seen in his thoughts.
It's a bestseller.

2.
Jhumpa Lahiri – The lowland
Tale of two boys in Communist Bengal.

3.
Mary Shelly – Frankenstein
Entire classic written from male point of view.

4.
Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights
Heathcliffe
5.
JK Rowling- Harry Potter series
Harry.
And the phenomenal change in Harry's life and thought process throughout the years.

And a special mention .

JK Rowling for Severus Snape.
Always.


Certainly.
My mom is a writer in Marathi and Hindi language.
She has developed some talk humane male protagonist.

So do some of brilliant lady authors eg McNaughton, Austen, Harper Lee, etc.
A writer peeps into psychology of human and observes and understand the human nature.
No one is super hero or heroine.
If a writer keeps all characters natural, else justifies superability all characters can turn out beautiful.


Dorothy Sayers created Lord Peter Wimsey, one of the best detectives in fiction (ironically, the best of the books are those in which Peter’s romantic interest Harriet Vane does not appear.
I am happy to argue, in fact, that one of the Harriet-free books, The Nine Tailors, is one of, if not the best English-language mystery novel ever written, precisely because unlike Christie and many contemporaries, you have all the information Peter does and all you need to solve the mystery.
No cheating with hidden information.
)


One of the short stories I wrote and submitted to be considered for admission to Washington University’s Writers Program was told from a first-person teen male’s perspective.

I got admitted and with full tuition remission.
I earned my MFA in fiction writing three years later.
While I was in grad school, St.
Louis Home
magazine published the same story and paid me $100 for it.

So the answer for this female is…yes.


Can female writers write good male characters?


My first instinct to this question was psh, tsk, duh of course we can.
And, after reading the other anwers and not really being impressed by the examples, I paused to think about it.
It's actually a great question.

A lot of the very popular female authors of course have male leads.
Some are strong, most are okay, many are weird pathetic crybabies.
I'm not going to give specific examples because clearly they would be opinion; no matter how correct and educated they are.
Fill in your own blanks.

Male leads or even secondary characters written by female authors have three roads at the beginning of their lives: Reflective Overcompensation, Underwhelming Unbalance, and Researched Body-mind.
They can travel between them, but they'll keep to one for the majority.

Of course all authors, male and female, struggle with correctly representing the opposite gender and every character will have their mistakes or plot holes written in to them, but a good author will research people constantly and those lessons will be respected and reflected in their characters.

All stories have their character flaws; there will be elements of each character road in all of them, but keep this in mind:
A good fiction author, someone who creates everything in their world as best they can without stealing from others or just hashing out derivative trope, is creating an entire world.
The landscape, the weather, the cities, the people, the cultures, the languages, the creatures, the emotions, the destinies, the civil issues, the wars, the struggles…everything that makes up a real world has to be forged from the ground up.

Give us a break if there are a few plotholes and weaknesses.


It’s a rare book that doesn’t have characters of the opposite sex to the writer.

Female writing about men or visa versa carries the risk of over emphasis on what we perceive as differences.
The reality is there aren’t that many differences.
There are strong and weak in both sexes, there are bigots and liberals, there are flirts and asexuals.

Unless it’s important to the story in some way, write without considering sexuality as a major issue.
A adventure story for example will have a strong central character whether they are male or female.
Concentrate on that, not on their sex.
Any small differences should be nuanced rather than highlighted.
Not all women scream at spiders.
Not all men refuse to cry.

In a romance the differences become a little more significant, but again a good writer will quell the desire to write about ‘swooning girls’ and ‘tall dark strangers’.

If you want to know how to write characters accurately, watch real people.
Watch how they interact in normal activities.
Sexuality is mostly irrelevant.


Absolutely.

I argue in Shadow Woman: The True Creator of Sherlock Holmes, that it was Louise Conan Doyle, not Arthur, who created Sherlock Holmes and wrote the early adventures.

Now the roles are reversed on me.
I’m writing a series of mysteries starring Louise, even before she met Arthur, in which she’s using the Sherlockian skills that must have been innate to her.

I think my seniority helps me since it has given me more time than most to study humanity from all angles.
In fact, I can’t imagine I could have (or would have) written of a female lead character when I was younger.

Louise, though, being a better observer of mankind that most anyone else, managed to create Holmes when she was in her twenties.

I suspect that anyone trying to write successfully across genders will have to sincerely understand and appreciate the differences that unite us all.


Female writers have the tendency to ‘romanticize’ men character to a point beyond reality.

It doesn’t mean EVERY women writer do this.
There very good examples about fabulous characters written by women.
Not only men (adult), but boys and ancient.

Men writers also have failures written women characters.
Mostly showing the extremes of it and little about the ‘real’.

There a re lately many books oriented to ‘women’… ’cause despite it have male characters, men don’t like it.

Me, one of my all time favorites is Agatha Christie.
Extraordinary!
Mary Shelley is another I can applaud.

But Rowling, Stephanie Meyer and EL James… please! →(Harry Potter, Twilight, 50 grades of.
.
)


Definitely.
Here are a few examples.

1.
RJ Palacio – Wonder
Not only did she create the character of August Pullman, but she made his innocence seen in his thoughts.
It's a bestseller.

2.
Jhumpa Lahiri – The lowland
Tale of two boys in Communist Bengal.

3.
Mary Shelly – Frankenstein
Entire classic written from male point of view.

4.
Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights
Heathcliffe
5.
JK Rowling- Harry Potter series
Harry.
And the phenomenal change in Harry's life and thought process throughout the years.

And a special mention .

JK Rowling for Severus Snape.
Always.


Certainly.
My mom is a writer in Marathi and Hindi language.
She has developed some talk humane male protagonist.

So do some of brilliant lady authors eg McNaughton, Austen, Harper Lee, etc.
A writer peeps into psychology of human and observes and understand the human nature.
No one is super hero or heroine.
If a writer keeps all characters natural, else justifies superability all characters can turn out beautiful.


Dorothy Sayers created Lord Peter Wimsey, one of the best detectives in fiction (ironically, the best of the books are those in which Peter’s romantic interest Harriet Vane does not appear.
I am happy to argue, in fact, that one of the Harriet-free books, The Nine Tailors, is one of, if not the best English-language mystery novel ever written, precisely because unlike Christie and many contemporaries, you have all the information Peter does and all you need to solve the mystery.
No cheating with hidden information.
)


One of the short stories I wrote and submitted to be considered for admission to Washington University’s Writers Program was told from a first-person teen male’s perspective.

I got admitted and with full tuition remission.
I earned my MFA in fiction writing three years later.
While I was in grad school, St.
Louis Home
magazine published the same story and paid me $100 for it.

So the answer for this female is…yes.


Can female writers write good male characters?


My first instinct to this question was psh, tsk, duh of course we can.
And, after reading the other anwers and not really being impressed by the examples, I paused to think about it.
It's actually a great question.

A lot of the very popular female authors of course have male leads.
Some are strong, most are okay, many are weird pathetic crybabies.
I'm not going to give specific examples because clearly they would be opinion; no matter how correct and educated they are.
Fill in your own blanks.

Male leads or even secondary characters written by female authors have three roads at the beginning of their lives: Reflective Overcompensation, Underwhelming Unbalance, and Researched Body-mind.
They can travel between them, but they'll keep to one for the majority.

Of course all authors, male and female, struggle with correctly representing the opposite gender and every character will have their mistakes or plot holes written in to them, but a good author will research people constantly and those lessons will be respected and reflected in their characters.

All stories have their character flaws; there will be elements of each character road in all of them, but keep this in mind:
A good fiction author, someone who creates everything in their world as best they can without stealing from others or just hashing out derivative trope, is creating an entire world.
The landscape, the weather, the cities, the people, the cultures, the languages, the creatures, the emotions, the destinies, the civil issues, the wars, the struggles…everything that makes up a real world has to be forged from the ground up.

Give us a break if there are a few plotholes and weaknesses.


It’s a rare book that doesn’t have characters of the opposite sex to the writer.

Female writing about men or visa versa carries the risk of over emphasis on what we perceive as differences.
The reality is there aren’t that many differences.
There are strong and weak in both sexes, there are bigots and liberals, there are flirts and asexuals.

Unless it’s important to the story in some way, write without considering sexuality as a major issue.
A adventure story for example will have a strong central character whether they are male or female.
Concentrate on that, not on their sex.
Any small differences should be nuanced rather than highlighted.
Not all women scream at spiders.
Not all men refuse to cry.

In a romance the differences become a little more significant, but again a good writer will quell the desire to write about ‘swooning girls’ and ‘tall dark strangers’.

If you want to know how to write characters accurately, watch real people.
Watch how they interact in normal activities.
Sexuality is mostly irrelevant.


Absolutely.

I argue in Shadow Woman: The True Creator of Sherlock Holmes, that it was Louise Conan Doyle, not Arthur, who created Sherlock Holmes and wrote the early adventures.

Now the roles are reversed on me.
I’m writing a series of mysteries starring Louise, even before she met Arthur, in which she’s using the Sherlockian skills that must have been innate to her.

I think my seniority helps me since it has given me more time than most to study humanity from all angles.
In fact, I can’t imagine I could have (or would have) written of a female lead character when I was younger.

Louise, though, being a better observer of mankind that most anyone else, managed to create Holmes when she was in her twenties.

I suspect that anyone trying to write successfully across genders will have to sincerely understand and appreciate the differences that unite us all.


Female writers have the tendency to ‘romanticize’ men character to a point beyond reality.

It doesn’t mean EVERY women writer do this.
There very good examples about fabulous characters written by women.
Not only men (adult), but boys and ancient.

Men writers also have failures written women characters.
Mostly showing the extremes of it and little about the ‘real’.

There a re lately many books oriented to ‘women’… ’cause despite it have male characters, men don’t like it.

Me, one of my all time favorites is Agatha Christie.
Extraordinary!
Mary Shelley is another I can applaud.

But Rowling, Stephanie Meyer and EL James… please! →(Harry Potter, Twilight, 50 grades of.
.
)


Definitely.
Here are a few examples.

1.
RJ Palacio – Wonder
Not only did she create the character of August Pullman, but she made his innocence seen in his thoughts.
It's a bestseller.

2.
Jhumpa Lahiri – The lowland
Tale of two boys in Communist Bengal.

3.
Mary Shelly – Frankenstein
Entire classic written from male point of view.

4.
Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights
Heathcliffe
5.
JK Rowling- Harry Potter series
Harry.
And the phenomenal change in Harry's life and thought process throughout the years.

And a special mention .

JK Rowling for Severus Snape.
Always.


Certainly.
My mom is a writer in Marathi and Hindi language.
She has developed some talk humane male protagonist.

So do some of brilliant lady authors eg McNaughton, Austen, Harper Lee, etc.
A writer peeps into psychology of human and observes and understand the human nature.
No one is super hero or heroine.
If a writer keeps all characters natural, else justifies superability all characters can turn out beautiful.


Dorothy Sayers created Lord Peter Wimsey, one of the best detectives in fiction (ironically, the best of the books are those in which Peter’s romantic interest Harriet Vane does not appear.
I am happy to argue, in fact, that one of the Harriet-free books, The Nine Tailors, is one of, if not the best English-language mystery novel ever written, precisely because unlike Christie and many contemporaries, you have all the information Peter does and all you need to solve the mystery.
No cheating with hidden information.
)


One of the short stories I wrote and submitted to be considered for admission to Washington University’s Writers Program was told from a first-person teen male’s perspective.

I got admitted and with full tuition remission.
I earned my MFA in fiction writing three years later.
While I was in grad school, St.
Louis Home
magazine published the same story and paid me $100 for it.

So the answer for this female is…yes.


Can female writers write good male characters?


My first instinct to this question was psh, tsk, duh of course we can.
And, after reading the other anwers and not really being impressed by the examples, I paused to think about it.
It's actually a great question.

A lot of the very popular female authors of course have male leads.
Some are strong, most are okay, many are weird pathetic crybabies.
I'm not going to give specific examples because clearly they would be opinion; no matter how correct and educated they are.
Fill in your own blanks.

Male leads or even secondary characters written by female authors have three roads at the beginning of their lives: Reflective Overcompensation, Underwhelming Unbalance, and Researched Body-mind.
They can travel between them, but they'll keep to one for the majority.

Of course all authors, male and female, struggle with correctly representing the opposite gender and every character will have their mistakes or plot holes written in to them, but a good author will research people constantly and those lessons will be respected and reflected in their characters.

All stories have their character flaws; there will be elements of each character road in all of them, but keep this in mind:
A good fiction author, someone who creates everything in their world as best they can without stealing from others or just hashing out derivative trope, is creating an entire world.
The landscape, the weather, the cities, the people, the cultures, the languages, the creatures, the emotions, the destinies, the civil issues, the wars, the struggles…everything that makes up a real world has to be forged from the ground up.

Give us a break if there are a few plotholes and weaknesses.


It’s a rare book that doesn’t have characters of the opposite sex to the writer.

Female writing about men or visa versa carries the risk of over emphasis on what we perceive as differences.
The reality is there aren’t that many differences.
There are strong and weak in both sexes, there are bigots and liberals, there are flirts and asexuals.

Unless it’s important to the story in some way, write without considering sexuality as a major issue.
A adventure story for example will have a strong central character whether they are male or female.
Concentrate on that, not on their sex.
Any small differences should be nuanced rather than highlighted.
Not all women scream at spiders.
Not all men refuse to cry.

In a romance the differences become a little more significant, but again a good writer will quell the desire to write about ‘swooning girls’ and ‘tall dark strangers’.

If you want to know how to write characters accurately, watch real people.
Watch how they interact in normal activities.
Sexuality is mostly irrelevant.


Absolutely.

I argue in Shadow Woman: The True Creator of Sherlock Holmes, that it was Louise Conan Doyle, not Arthur, who created Sherlock Holmes and wrote the early adventures.

Now the roles are reversed on me.
I’m writing a series of mysteries starring Louise, even before she met Arthur, in which she’s using the Sherlockian skills that must have been innate to her.

I think my seniority helps me since it has given me more time than most to study humanity from all angles.
In fact, I can’t imagine I could have (or would have) written of a female lead character when I was younger.

Louise, though, being a better observer of mankind that most anyone else, managed to create Holmes when she was in her twenties.

I suspect that anyone trying to write successfully across genders will have to sincerely understand and appreciate the differences that unite us all.


Female writers have the tendency to ‘romanticize’ men character to a point beyond reality.

It doesn’t mean EVERY women writer do this.
There very good examples about fabulous characters written by women.
Not only men (adult), but boys and ancient.

Men writers also have failures written women characters.
Mostly showing the extremes of it and little about the ‘real’.

There a re lately many books oriented to ‘women’… ’cause despite it have male characters, men don’t like it.

Me, one of my all time favorites is Agatha Christie.
Extraordinary!
Mary Shelley is another I can applaud.

But Rowling, Stephanie Meyer and EL James… please! →(Harry Potter, Twilight, 50 grades of.
.
)


Definitely.
Here are a few examples.

1.
RJ Palacio – Wonder
Not only did she create the character of August Pullman, but she made his innocence seen in his thoughts.
It's a bestseller.

2.
Jhumpa Lahiri – The lowland
Tale of two boys in Communist Bengal.

3.
Mary Shelly – Frankenstein
Entire classic written from male point of view.

4.
Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights
Heathcliffe
5.
JK Rowling- Harry Potter series
Harry.
And the phenomenal change in Harry's life and thought process throughout the years.

And a special mention .

JK Rowling for Severus Snape.
Always.


Certainly.
My mom is a writer in Marathi and Hindi language.
She has developed some talk humane male protagonist.

So do some of brilliant lady authors eg McNaughton, Austen, Harper Lee, etc.
A writer peeps into psychology of human and observes and understand the human nature.
No one is super hero or heroine.
If a writer keeps all characters natural, else justifies superability all characters can turn out beautiful.


Dorothy Sayers created Lord Peter Wimsey, one of the best detectives in fiction (ironically, the best of the books are those in which Peter’s romantic interest Harriet Vane does not appear.
I am happy to argue, in fact, that one of the Harriet-free books, The Nine Tailors, is one of, if not the best English-language mystery novel ever written, precisely because unlike Christie and many contemporaries, you have all the information Peter does and all you need to solve the mystery.
No cheating with hidden information.
)


One of the short stories I wrote and submitted to be considered for admission to Washington University’s Writers Program was told from a first-person teen male’s perspective.

I got admitted and with full tuition remission.
I earned my MFA in fiction writing three years later.
While I was in grad school, St.
Louis Home
magazine published the same story and paid me $100 for it.

So the answer for this female is…yes.

Updated: 08.06.2019 — 6:36 pm

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